11 Plague, patriarchy and ‘girl power’ Jane Humphries Introduction The inspiration for this chapter comes from an earlier contribution, written with Jill Rubery in 1984, which surveyed theories of social reproduction and its relationship to the economy. We argued that the family, notwithstanding its extensive responsibilities for reproducing, training and socialising future workers, had not been established as an interesting, central and dynamic variable for ­economic analysis (Humphries and Rubery, 1984). Instead, across the whole spectrum of theoretical

in Making work more equal
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Deaths and politicised deaths in Buenos Aires’s refuse

The appearance of corpses in rubbish tips is not a recent phenomenon. In Argentina, tips have served not only as sites for the disposal of bodies but also as murder scenes. Many of these other bodies found in such places belong to individuals who have suffered violent deaths, which go on to become public issues, or else are ‘politicised deaths’. Focusing on two cases that have received differing degrees of social, political and media attention – Diego Duarte, a 15-year-old boy from a poor background who went waste-picking on an open dump and never came back, and Ángeles Rawson, a girl of 16 murdered in the middle-class neighbourhood of Colegiales, whose body was found in the same tip – this article deals with the social meanings of bodies that appear in landfills. In each case, there followed a series of events that placed a certain construction on the death – and, more importantly, the life – of the victim. Corpses, once recognised, become people, and through this process they are given new life. It is my contention that bodies in rubbish tips express – and configure – not only the limits of the social but also, in some cases, the limits of the human itself.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

5 Incest and immorality Introduction 1884, the Recorder of Dublin commented with regard to the case of a fiftyyear-old man charged with ‘assault to ravish his daughter’: 1 [T]his was one of the worst cases ever proven in a Criminal Court. On submitted evidence this man was proven to have committed an act of violence, an unnatural offence on his own child, a girl of fourteen. The circumstances were unspeakably shocking. The prisoner should have been sentenced to penal servitude for life.2 The man received two years’ imprisonment in separate confinement; but

in The cruelty man
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Bringing up children for a good future

the purpose of the prayer and why it is necessary to wear a veil and she spoke in great detail about regulations for dress and women’s behaviour. It was my clear impression that the speech had an educational purpose, being directed at mothers, who should raise their children as good Muslims, as 118 Ritual as a cultural prism well as the young girls who were supposed to learn from it. In her speech, Umm Hussein also pointed to the specific situation of living in a European country. She explained that people in Iraq or Iran become very surprised when she tells them

in Iraqi women in Denmark
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vaccination of teenage girls in schools in 1970, so that gradually the cohort of child-bearing women would be fully protected from rubella. 74 Women were also offered the vaccine, but they had to undergo blood tests to determine whether or not they were immune to the disease beforehand. Since there was a risk of damage to the foetus if a woman became pregnant within three months of being vaccinated, authorities did not want to risk vaccinating women who would not directly benefit. Because of the inconvenience of this testing system, it was less common for non

in Vaccinating Britain
The effects of gender, households and ethnicity

of temporary, part-time and zero-hours contracts. Gender differences between young men and women appear to have converged on several standard labour market indicators (such as employment rate, unemployment rate, share of temporary and part-time work) (Eamets et al., 2015), although young women are still more likely to be  ‘not in employment education or training’ (NEET) than young men. Where there has been a levelling in gender disparities this is largely owing to an overall decline in the male labour market and men’s educational outcomes, while girls’ performance

in Making work more equal
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A new labour market segmentation approach

This book presents new theories and international empirical evidence on the state of work and employment around the world. Changes in production systems, economic conditions and regulatory conditions are posing new questions about the growing use by employers of precarious forms of work, the contradictory approaches of governments towards employment and social policy, and the ability of trade unions to improve the distribution of decent employment conditions. Designed as a tribute to the highly influential contributions of Jill Rubery, the book proposes a ‘new labour market segmentation approach’ for the investigation of issues of job quality, employment inequalities, and precarious work. This approach is distinctive in seeking to place the changing international patterns and experiences of labour market inequalities in the wider context of shifting gender relations, regulatory regimes and production structures.

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Same city but a different place?

precaution taken that we still need to educate youth about boundaries. (Protestant girl) The city of Belfast is a controversial place, a place where the tourism industry has increased rapidly over the past few years and a place that country folk frown upon. I love living in Belfast. It is a city full of potential with shops, offices and parks, not just the same

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Everyday life in interface areas

many teenagers challenged the popular media image of interface areas as ‘territorially stigmatised’ places (Waquant, 2007 ). As one Catholic girl put it: I absolutely love the people of Belfast and how every family tends to know each other. I enjoy the true sense of a strong community. Only in Belfast would a neighbour

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Teens’ perceptions and experiences of peace walls, flags and murals

Shalhoub-Kevorkian’s ( 2006 ) research on children lining up to cross the ‘security fence’ separating Palestine from Israel . Her observations caused one girl to state in bewilderment, ‘why are you looking at us, we go through this everyday’. In other words, young people in politically contested societies may become habituated to the ‘abnormal’ features of their surrounding environment. Similarly in

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast