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C. E. Beneš

he who wishes to take a wife ought to consider if the girl he wishes to marry has both good parents, or both bad, or one good and the other bad. 5 If both parents are good, he may safely marry her because a good tree bears good fruit. If both are bad, he should give her up entirely because a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. But if one is good and the other is bad, he should be cautious and watch diligently [to see] what he ought to

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

this and they sent him into the forest to be brought up among shepherds. When he had grown up, he became a very capable young man who used to beat all the boys his own age in all the games. At that time Peleus, the father of Achilles, took Thetis as his wife, as Ovid tells; and to his nuptials he invited Jove, Neptune, Apollo, and Mercury, who were called gods, and three very beautiful girls, that is, Juno, Pallas [Minerva], and Venus, who were

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

strict on this point, requiring silence on three days of every week in the year [ 19 ]; even for communication with their servants, anchorites should rely on sign-language [ 24 ]. Although their conversation might be limited, servants offered companionship. Ancrene Wisse also allows a cat, 13 and the visionary anchoress of Winchester has a young girl (presumably a maidservant) who keeps her company when she is

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

along with other facts, such as: once when a certain man was eating something, a bone from some meat stuck in his throat so that he could neither swallow it nor spit it out. 5 Fearing the threat of death, he turned with complete devotion to Saint Valentine and made an internal vow: immediately the bone flew out of him and he made a full recovery. Likewise, a certain girl who was lame and unable to walk dedicated

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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thirteenth-century England [ 17 ]. It records a contemporary impression that this was a land of many towns, markedly diverse one from another: ‘marble of Corfe, cattle of Nottingham …’. If some of the noted associations seem less grounded in economic realities and more likely to be the trace of personal experience – ‘girls of Hereford, beggars of Chichester’ – we should acknowledge that such impressions

in Towns in medieval England

‘That it is not permitted in the laws of marriage to choose the fiancée of another. You asked about a violation of marriage, whether one man is able to receive in marriage a girl engaged to another. We prohibit this from happening in every way, for violation by any transgression of the blessing which the priest gives the girl to be

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
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typically play a practical part in the provision of care [ 107 ]. Such was the almshouse in Stratford-upon-Avon, rebuilt at the start of the fifteenth century by the local guild of the Holy Cross. Poor people, not members of the guild, were taken in on request, including, in 1475–76, ‘Agnes, a girl in the almshouse’, and Robert Scot and John Dunseprowe, for whose attendance Margaret Myller received a reward

in Towns in medieval England
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marry Waldrada in particular. Lothar had probably already had children with Waldrada before his marriage, but marriage to another young Frankish girl would also have offered him good prospects of children. 38 It is also unlikely that Lothar II would have been preoccupied with his succession in 860. At that point, Lothar was only in his mid-twenties, while Charles the Bald

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

along the Rhine. This knight had married a princess, and from him the present Cleves were descended. After the entremets , a chaplet of flowers was presented to the count of Étampes 22 who held another banquet ten days later. At this banquet, the chaplet was then handed to the duke by a young girl, dressed in a robe written on with Greek letters, led

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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of honour. The young girls of the household should be called damsels or gentleladies, and not girls of honour. And the woman who is entrusted with the charge of these girls should be called by her name, such as ‘Joan’ or ‘Margaret’, and she should not be called the mother of the girls. And there should be no gentleman in the house to whom the title of

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530