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John Mundy and Glyn White

comedies, drew heavily on the madcap slapstick and crazy verbal humour of the early 1930s films but focused their comedy on the archetypical Hollywood romance narrative: Boy meets Girl, Boy loses Girl, Boy gets Girl, a sequence clearly indicating the passive female and active male of classical Hollywood, which was already in place when the sound romantic comedy arrived. The formation of a couple (or, in what Stanley

in Laughing matters
Abstract only
John Mundy and Glyn White

though the girls served little purpose as comic devices. In the same way, Keystone’s ‘Kid Komedies’ series from 1913 onwards made unashamed use of the ‘cute’ appeal of child stars such as Paul Jacobs, whilst perpetuating the animosities between adults and malicious youngsters established with the ‘bad boy’ genre a decade earlier. In his highly unreliable memoirs, Sennett claimed that Keystone ‘was a

in Laughing matters
Abstract only
Richard Kilborn

seven-year-olds to be subjects of the World in Action programme. The dice were loaded from the outset, however, since most of the children were chosen from opposite ends of the social spectrum. The selection of children was made, one imagines, in order that the programme be better able to substantiate the thesis it wanted to advance about Britain still being a country wracked by class divisions. The sample was also, however, chronically imbalanced in terms of gender and ethnicity (only four girls and only one non-white child). As a World in Action Special, the Seven

in Taking the long view
From bad taste to gross-out
John Mundy and Glyn White

edible. He moves on to take a tray through self-service, piling it high, stuffing his pockets and sampling the food including inhaling a jelly and stuffing a whole cheeseburger into his mouth. Then, coming to the aid of a delta fraternity brother, he joins a table of killjoy alpha students including the girl he most lusts after, disgusting them with his appetite and, in the course of pretending to be a

in Laughing matters
John Mundy and Glyn White

’s character, Loco, is recruited into the scheme. The other girls are broke and they invite her up as long as she can feed them on the 25 cents she has and whatever else she can use her sex appeal to acquire. The guy who helps her, pays for and carries up her groceries is the handsome Tom Brookman (Cameron Mitchell) whom Schatze (Bacall) immediately dismisses as strictly petrol pump attendant material. The

in Laughing matters
Richard Kilborn

-determined boxes, especially when it comes to assessing their future prospects. There is one telling moment, for instance, when Apted directs the following provocative question at the three girls: ‘There’s a danger you’ll get married in your early twenties and have children quickly and then be stuck at home. Any thoughts?’ Judging by their body language, Jackie and her friends are extremely resentful at being pigeonholed in this way, as indeed they should be. It is only many years later, however, in a memorable sequence in 49 Up, that Jackie (always the most feisty of the three

in Taking the long view
Questioning gender roles
Brigitte Rollet

international conference denouncing violence against women took place at the Mutualité and was extremely successful. In November of the same year the Bobigny trial took place. After the abortion, following the rape of a 15-year-old girl, her mother and her ‘accomplices’ faced charges and their trial illustrated the inadequacies of the law. They were defended by the feminist lawyer Gisèle Halimi who collaborated in the creation of the association Choisir in 1971 which aimed at defending anyone involved in a trial following their participation in

in Coline Serreau
Dolores Tierney

(yet fiery) middle-class girl, by a lower-class, zapatista revolutionary general, José Juan Reyes (Pedro Armendáriz). Jean Franco has read this narrative as one which seeks to refeminize the ‘masculinized’ woman, returning her to her proper place within patriarchy after the disruption of the revolution: ‘The broken family, the cult of violence, and the independent “masculinized” woman have to be transformed into a new holy

in Emilio Fernández
Parameters of Jewish identity
Joseph McGonagle

Jews in France is clearly established, it is striking how often the film repeatedly foregrounds in contrast several acts of kindness, sympathy and solidarity towards Jews by others. Viewers therefore see a plumber working in the Vél’ d’Hiv provide a pass that enables a young Jewish girl to escape by pretending to be his wife; firemen contravene police orders by providing water to detainees; and attempts by neighbours to hide and protect Jewish children from being taken away by police. However grounded in reality such acts are, their recurrence and prominence on

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
Representations of Marseille
Joseph McGonagle

, positioned either side of him, are sufficiently distanced from one another to permit almost all his body to be seen. Therefore despite his role as onlooker, he becomes noticeably prominent. The confluence of these factors accentuates his height and physical presence; as the only black man in the photograph, his skin colour is highlighted too – so much so that viewers might begin to wonder whether the p ­ rocession is really the subject of the photograph at all. A similar effect occurs elsewhere: a large photograph (Jeanmougin: 98) shows two girls walking with their heads

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture