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Clear All
Kerstin Bergman

INTRODUCTION What is known in the English-speaking world as The Millennium trilogy , or The girl with the dragon tattoo series, originated as three novels published in Swedish (2005–07), written by Stieg Larsson (1954–2004). 1 One of the series’ protagonists, Lisbeth Salander, sports several tattoos, among them one depicting a dragon. This facet was not used in the original Swedish titles of the novels – nor was the phrase ‘the girl with the dragon tattoo’ found anywhere in the novels or in Larsson

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Unveiling American Muslim women in Rolla Selbak’s Three Veils (2011)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

-confessedly had a difficult time raising funds for the film, given its controversial themes and its depiction of an American ethno-religious minority. The film charts the interwoven stories of three young Arab women in contemporary suburban California: Leila (Mercedes Mason), an American middle-class girl whose Middle Eastern parents have arranged her upcoming marriage to the seemingly pious Ali (Sammy Sheik); Amira (Angela Zahra), a young working-class Egyptian woman experiencing religiously repressed homosexual attraction; and Nikki (Sheetal Sheth), a young woman born in

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Marking and remarking
Editors: Kate Watson and Katharine Cox

Tattoos in crime and detective narratives: Marking and remarking examines representations of the tattoo and tattooing in literature, television and film, from two periods of tattoo renaissance (1851–1914, and around 1955 to the present). The collection reads tattoos and associated scarification, such as branding, as mimetic devices that mark and remark crime and detective narratives in complex ways. The chapters utilise a variety of critical perspectives drawn from posthumanism, spatiality, postcolonialism, embodiment and gender studies to read the tattoo as individual and community bodily narratives. The collection develops its focus from the first tattoo renaissance and considers the rebirth of the tattoo in contemporary culture through literature, children's literature, film and television. This book has a broad appeal and will be of interest to all literature and media scholars and, in particular, those with an interest in crime and detective narratives and skin studies.

Criminal minds, CSI: NY and Law and order
Ruth Hawthorn and John Miller

provides striking evidence of the limits of tattooing as a sign, or at least a stable sign, of feminist struggle. ‘Oedipus Hex’ presents us with precisely this tension between alternative feminist embodiment and (for the most part) masculine consumption. The episode focuses on the murder of a Suicide Girl immediately after a sexually-charged performance at a ‘punk show’. Initially, suspicion falls on her fellow Suicide Girls, before the murderer is revealed as a male tattoo artist. With members of the SuicideGirls ( SG ) community playing

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Tattoos, the Mark of Cain and fan culture
Karin Beeler

and the ‘criminal’ Mark of Cain. I will also address how the show incorporates intertextuality, references or allusions to other iconic or canonical texts (literature or film) and elements of popular culture to reinforce images of tattooed bodies. These include The girl with the dragon tattoo (a Swedish crime novel that was published posthumously and has been adapted into film), the Star wars films, The wizard of Oz (novel and film) and the Bible ( Book of Genesis ). An examination of how these production and intertextual elements cross over into the fan

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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A queer and cartographic exploration of the Palestinian diaspora in Randa Jarrar’s A Map of Home (2008) and Him, Me, Muhammad Ali (2016)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

: I wanted to sing ‘You Are My Life’ and pretend that I was Umm Kulthum, who began singing when she was little. I’d heard stories about how her baba didn’t want her to stop but he was scared that his little girl would be taken advantage of or not be taken seriously because of her sex, so he put her in boys’ clothes and pretended to others, and soon to himself, that she was a boy, and in this costume she was safe to be herself and to be happy. […] Baba had been pretending all my life that I was a boy, from the moment of my birth, even before. Tonight was possibly the

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Marking women and nonhuman animals
Kate Watson and Rebekah Humphreys

, The bone collector ( 2014a ); for example, Billy is inspired by his predecessor’s modus operandi . The skin collector is also undeniably inspired by previous tattoo/crime narratives, and it self-referentially draws attention to Stieg Larsson’s The girl with the dragon tattoo ( 2005 ) thriller throughout the novel. The interconnection of gender, the tattoo, textual branding, crime and nonhumans (pigs) is also apparent in Larsson’s novel, where Lisbeth Salander tattoos ‘I AM A SADISTIC PIG, A PERVERT, AND A RAPIST’ (Larsson, 2008 : 235; author’s emphasis) on

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Matrilinearity, Sufism, and l’errance in the autofictional works of Abdellah Taïa
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

growing up in Morocco. The opening of An Arab Melancholia narrates the near-rape of Abdellah, aged twelve, by a group of older Moroccan teenagers, led by the character dubbed Chouaïb. Here, Taïa’s autofiction illustrates Jean-Paul Sartre’s disquisition of active and passive homosexuals in Genet’s work, whereby the active homosexual’s subjugation of the lover ‘moves to the inessential’, since he ‘derives his poignant beauty from the love that the girl queen bears him’ (Sartre, 2012 , pp. 336–7). In the episode’s preliminaries, private and public perceptions

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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Thinking across
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

Britain, France, Italy, the USA, and Canada. ‘Clash of civilizations’ rhetoric often constructs Muslims as the ‘enemy within’, so I have chosen to explore identitarian tensions in the work of queer Muslims located in the West in order to gauge their challenges to sturdy ideologies of both the nation and the diaspora. Other European national perspectives and, indeed, genres remain to be explored, such as Beldan Sezen’s Snapshots of a Girl , a semi-autobiographical graphic novel depicting Turkish same-sex desire in Turkey, Germany, the Netherlands, and the USA. Another

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Queering ethnicity and British Muslim masculinities in Sally El Hosaini’s My Brother the Devil (2012)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

distraught, decides, according to her voiceover, to brew a concoction that will ‘bond eternal love when all hope disappears’ ( Henna Night , 2009 ). After the party, Amina’s mother (Badria Timimi) leaves both girls in Amina’s room, where they inconspicuously share a bed, highlighting the invisibility to normative society of female same-sex desire. Nour then offers Amina a glass containing her ‘magical’ potion; after Amina has tasted it, Nour tells her that she loves her, to which Amina responds with ‘I know’; Nour then drinks the remaining contents. When dawn breaks

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film