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The narrative of east Manchester
Georgina Blakeley
and
Brendan Evans

diversity of activity. The temporal aspect is evident as we map the changes and continuities in regeneration priorities from NDC’s original delivery plan of 1999 and NEM’s Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) of 2000–2008 to the present day, including the SRF of 2008–2018 and the Eastlands Regeneration Framework which resulted from the agreement between MCC, MCFC and NEM in 2011. We also consider the impact of the global recession after 2008, the change in national government in May 2010 and the resulting cuts to public spending. The complex nature of this temporal

in The regeneration of east Manchester
Author:

With race as a central theme, this book presents racial stratification as the underlying system which accounts for the difference in outcomes of Whites and Blacks in the labour market. Critical race theory (CRT) is employed to discuss the operation, research, maintenance and impact of racial stratification. The power of this book is the innovative use of a stratification framework to expose the pervasiveness of racial inequality in the labour market. It teaches readers how to use CRT to investigate the racial hierarchy and it provides a replicable framework to identify the racial order based on insight from the Irish case. There is a four-stage framework in the book which helps readers understand how migrants navigate the labour market from the point of migration to labour participation. The book also highlights minority agency and how migrants respond to their marginality. The examples of how social acceptance can be applied in managing difference in the workplace are an added bonus for those interested in diversity and inclusion. This book is the first of its kind in Ireland and across Europe to present inequality, racism and discrimination in the labour market from a racial stratification perspective. While this book is based on Irish data, the CRT theoretical approach, as well as its insight into migrant perspectives, poses a strong appeal to scholars of sociology, social justice, politics, intercultural communication and economics with interest in race and ethnicity, critical whiteness and migration. It is a timely contribution to CRT which offers scholars a method to conduct empirical study of racial stratification across different countries bypassing the over-reliance on secondary data. It will also appeal to countries and scholars examining causal racism and how it shapes racial inequality.

Abstract only
Georgina Blakeley
and
Brendan Evans

initiative which it has been argued is the most ‘policy thick’ area in Britain (Ward, 2003: 123). The narrative of how east Manchester became such an extreme case of deprivation, and of the various attempts to respond to the problem, is itself a purpose of the book and we describe the way in which the initiative emerged and explain how it developed. The revival of a substantial area of a great city, which began in a major way with the new Labour Government after 1997, is a task that is never completed. The global recession, the election of the Coalition Government and

in The regeneration of east Manchester
Abstract only
Georgina Blakeley
and
Brendan Evans

Manchester. We claim that evaluating this specific situation can only be done against the inherited situation of the 1990s, and with allowance made for the effect of the global recession. Against this backdrop there were gains in economic development through the attraction of inward investment and the location of business in the area, although ultimately it is the wider economic context which will determine the long-­term success of these gains. The conviction of MCC officials that they have successfully repositioned east Manchester as a place to live encourages them to

in The regeneration of east Manchester
Class polarisation and neo-liberalism in the Irish Republic
Kieran Allen

recession can be disproved by even the most cursory glance at the records. For example, on 25 August 2001, The Economist announced in its lead article, ‘Welcome to the first global recession of the 21st century’.18) Concepts like ‘consumer eih ch-3.P65 59 26/3/03, 15:09 60 Allen confidence’ are also treated almost as psychological irreducibles that intrude on the otherwise smooth workings of a system that brings supply and demand into equilibrium. Of course, once you adopt this perspective there is often a danger of ‘talking ourselves into a recession’ – hence the

in The end of Irish history?
Denis O’Hearn

hundreds or thousands of construction workers are stranded without any prospect of employment or even the means to move out of the now-depressed area. Thus, the idea that there is a single kind of ‘bubble economy’ is out of the question and even within a single global recession one could expect a variety of different patterns of expansion, causes of burst and social consequences of economic decline.6 The recent ‘sub-prime mortgage bubble’ burst at different times and in different ways and patterns, depending on how a given country and certain of its economic sectors were

in Are the Irish different?
Abstract only
The place of migration
Mary Gilmartin
and
Allen White

fundamental ways on national sovereignty. Transnational migrant life is but one of a dense network of transnational flows that shape and mould local places in complex ways. Goodwin-White shows how the labour market experiences of different national groups in Ireland have changed in different ways throughout a period of savage economic contraction prompted by a devastating global recession. She shows how migrants from the EU-12 have been disproportionately affected by job losses and unemployment, while job losses among native workers were significantly fewer than expected if

in Migrations
Ebun Joseph

Jewish traders, where customers were urged to buy Irish and ‘help stamp out sweated, Jewish labour, in the Tailoring Trade in Dublin’ (Keogh, 1999: 54). That boycott, which was largely instigated by a Catholic JOSEPH 9781526134394 PRINT.indd 62 03/07/2020 15:44 Migration, whiteness and Irish racism 63 priest, Fr Creagh (Fanning, 2002), finally took its toll on the livelihood of the Jews, many of whom were reported to have left Limerick. In the 1930s and 1940s, the Irish government also refused to take in Jewish refugees from Nazi Europe. The wave of global

in Critical race theory and inequality in the labour market
Love and (same-sex) marriage in the twenty-first century
Angela O’Connell

advantages, not on the identity of the disadvantaged. In Ireland, mechanisms for grass-roots influencing of social change have been largely co-opted by the state, and the global recession has reduced the capacity of many civil society organisations to pursue activism. There have, however, as other examples in this volume demonstrate, been instances where civil society has successfully mobilised behind a cause with greater or lesser degrees of energy and resources. Where large-scale funding from philanthropic organisations was secured, some movements were empowered to

in Defining events
London as an event city and the 2012 Olympics
Maurice Roche

years prior to the Olympics, in 2010, three of the four local authority areas (or ‘boroughs’, namely Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham) in which the Olympic Park and its Olympic sport venues were to be located were assessed as being in the twenty most socially deprived local authority areas in England.18 The main Olympic borough, Newham, had particularly high levels of unemployment, household overcrowding, recent immigration and ethnic complexity.19 Perhaps understandably, given the onset of both a global recession and a UK national economic recession from 2008, the

in Mega-events and social change