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Food choice, disease prevention and the role of the food industry in health promotion in England, 1980–92
Jane Hand

promoted the idea that individualised health risks could be overcome (at least in part) by newly constructed health consumers complying with a myriad of health advice that included specific recommendations about food consumption. Alongside public health authorities, the NHS was creating a new understanding of who the target of public health initiatives was and what was expected of them in the realm of disease

in Publics and their health
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

immunisation 1991–2001’, Vaccine , 23:48–49 (2005), 5670–87. 12 Jane Lewis, ‘The prevention of diphtheria in Canada and Britain 1914–1945’, Journal of Social History , 20:1 (1986), 163–76; Linda Bryder, ‘ “We shall not find salvation in inoculation”: BCG vaccination in Scandinavia, Britain and the USA, 1921–1960’, Social Science & Medicine , 49:9 (1999), 1157–67. 13 Alex Mold, Making the Patient-Consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015

in Vaccinating Britain
Tinne Claes
and
Katrin Pilz

was a population of ‘health consumers’ or students training to be physicians. Storck’s efforts to promote these films were not exclusively grounded in the wish to better citizens’ health, but were also a strategical attempt to better his standing with national authorities and to secure his future career as a filmmaker. The transformation of the film medium into a channel of

in Medical histories of Belgium
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

financial incentive to do so. The single vaccine, given in two doses, was also much more convenient. However, this system still required parents to choose to vaccinate. This caused problems during the MMR crisis itself. For while there was little counter information or other options available to parents, there was only one obvious choice. When the MMR–autism link became more widely talked about and an alternative action was considered possible – separate vaccinations – choice became a major issue. The rise of the rhetoric around choice and growing health consumerism meant

in Vaccinating Britain
Visualising obesity as a public health concern in 1970s and 1980s Britain
Jane Hand

people to interiorise health advice and show self-restraint,  26 while at the same time consuming more (albeit different) products to secure the continued success of the consumer society. Health consumerism demonstrated respect for the development of new diet markets and consequently the marketisation of nutrition and health itself. 27 In this process images were key. They repeatedly constructed and coded notions of acceptable health behaviour within established modes of

in Balancing the self
Stephen T. Casper

elaborate, however, studies of specialisation have largely ignored the different modes of under­ standings that specialisation only slowly and incompletely replaced. Put succinctly, people had first to apprehend and value the specialisation phenomenon before they could become specialists. So too did there need to be practical value to the specialisation phenomenon, both for its producers and also for its consumers. The value of specialisation, at least for British neurologists and the health consumers of British neurology, was apparently ephemeral enough that few

in The neurologists
The working lives of paid carers from 1800 to the 1990s
Anne Borsay
and
Pamela Dale

appropriate and timely interventions with clients.92 Reflecting a new health consumerism, government publications since the 1990s have emphasised improving the patient experience and encouraging choice. Ensuring the availability of staff with appropriate skills was an important underlying theme, but it was not always made explicit who these workers were or might be in the future. The employment of nurses within community mental health and crisis intervention teams in the recent past has as yet attracted limited attention from historians, but there have been a succession of

in Mental health nursing
Abstract only
Searching for the patient
Anne Hanley
and
Jessica Meyer

See, for example, Fiona Reid, Medicine in First World War Europe: Soldiers, Medics, Pacifists (London: Bloomsbury, 2017), 198. 15 For more on these post-war changes, see Alex Molds, Making the Consumer Patient: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), 5; David Armstrong, ‘The Patient's View’, Social Science and Medicine 18:9 (1984), 737–44; David Armstrong

in Patient voices in Britain, 1840–1948
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

is concerned at the lack of statistics concerning vaccine-damaged children: believes that their case for compensation is at least as just as those children suffering as a result of the thalidomide tragedy; and demands an immediate investigation into the problem.’ HC Deb (3 December 1974) vol. 882, cc. 1514–26. 42 Mary McCormack, ‘The hazards of health’, Guardian (3 August 1973), p. 11. 43 Alex Mold, Making the Patient-consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

1970s’, in Matthew Hilton and James McKay (eds), The Ages of Voluntarism : How we got to the Big Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), pp. 114–34; Alex Mold, Making the Patient-consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015). 36 On risk, see Chapter 4 and Ulrich Beck, Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity (London: Sage, 1992); Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky, Risk and Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983); Jakob Arnoldi, Risk: An

in Vaccinating Britain