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The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg

The career, mental world and writings of Regino, abbot of Prüm, were all defined by the Carolingian empire and, more particularly, by its end. The high Ottonian period of the mid-tenth century also witnessed a revival of historiography, exemplified by the work of the two major authors who wrote about the rise of the dynasty. The first of these was Liutprand of Cremona, whose Antapodosis, a history of European politics from 888 until around 950, and Historia Ottonis, a focused account of events surrounding Otto's imperial coronation, were both written in the earlier 960s. The second was Adalbert, who most probably wrote his continuation to the Chronicle in 967/968. Regino's Chronicle, dedicated to Bishop Adalbero of Augsburg in the year 908, was the last work of its kind for several decades, and as such its author can be regarded as the last great historian of the Carolingian Empire. The Chronicle is divided into two books. The first, subtitled 'On the times of the Lord's incarnation', begins with the incarnation of Christ and proceeds as far as the death of Charles Martel in 741. The second 'On the deeds of the kings of the Franks' takes the story from the death of Charles Martel through to 906. The much shorter continuation by Adalbert of Magdeburg enjoys a place in the canon of works relating to the history of the earliest German Reich and consequently has received considerably more attention.

The chapter provides an annotated translation of The History of the Tyrants of Sicily by the so-called Hugo Falcandus.

in The History of the Tyrants of Sicily by ‘Hugo Falcandus’ 1154–69

This book is our principal source for the history of the Kingdom of Sicily in the troubled years between the death of its founder, King Roger, in February 1154 and the spring of 1169. It covers the reign of Roger's son, King William I, known to later centuries as 'the Bad', and the minority of the latter's son, William II 'the Good'. The book illustrates the revival of classical learning during the twelfth-century renaissance. It presents a vivid and compelling picture of royal tyranny, rebellion and factional dispute at court. Sicily had historically been ruled by tyrants, and that the rule of the new Norman kings could be seen, for a variety of reasons, as a revival of that classical tyranny. A more balanced view of Sicilian history of the period 1153-1169 has been provided as an appendix to the translation in the section of the contemporary world chronicle ascribed to Archbishop Romuald II of Salerno, who died in April 1181. In particular the chronicle of Romuald enables us to see how the papal schism of 1159 and the simultaneous dispute between the German Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and the north Italian cities affected the destiny of the kingdom of Sicily. In contrast to the shadowy figure of Pseudo-Hugo, the putative author of the principal narrative of mid-twelfth-century Sicilian history, Romuald II, Archbishop of Salerno 1153-1181, is well-documented.

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currency and expression of such ideas. They also exemplify some of the ways in which a distinguished history and idealised image of the town circulated and became embedded in local culture. Stories told to children, rhymes and song, sermons delivered in honour of locally venerated saints, mythical tales of kings and giants, antiquarian researches by town clerks, all enriched the shared memories of

in Towns in medieval England
C. E. Beneš

Therefore regarding this translation or revelation we have composed both a history and metrical hymns which are chanted solemnly in the church of San Lorenzo. 156 Chapter seventeen: Regarding Airaldus, seventeenth bishop. Airaldus Guarachus, the seventeenth bishop, took office around the year of the Lord 1099 and completed seventeen years in the episcopate

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

those in the Ecclesiastical history , the Tripartite history , the Scholastic history , and the chronicles of many different authors. 186 After the prologue, this work begins, ‘The Advent of the Lord’ ( Adventus Domini ), etc. 187 He also wrote two volumes of sermons on all the saints, by which their feasts are celebrated according to the cycle of the church year

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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strands of this dynastically-sponsored phenomenon, the writing and re-writing of history loom large. The elites of the Carolingian age not only keenly devoured classical and biblical history, but also saw to the composition of a panoply of contemporary historical works. Several major sets of annals inspired by the Royal Frankish Annals , a work associated with the court of Charlemagne, together with a variety of

in History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe
C. E. Beneš

divided world history from Creation to Revelation into six ‘ages’; the third age extended from Abraham to King David. 3 A diminutive form of Janua ; Solinus, De mirabilibus mundi 2.5. 4 According to Eusebius/Jerome, 1511

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa

even in old and holy histories many similar stories are told of Saul and David and other kings. These are allowed to be read in every Church throughout the world for the profit of those listening. I have therefore preferred from time to time to turn away from the cares of monks without any sin rather than that these deeds be suppressed in pointless silence and remain utterly without fruit. Indeed, it was the

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily
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The History of the Tyrants of Sicily attributed to ‘Hugo Falcandus’ is our principal source for the history of the kingdom of Sicily in the troubled years between the death of its founder, King Roger, in February 1154 and the spring of 1169. It covers the reign of Roger’s son, King William I, known to later centuries as ‘the Bad’, and the minority of the latter’s son

in The History of the Tyrants of Sicily by ‘Hugo Falcandus’ 1154–69