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Essence, difference and assimilation in Daniel Waters’s Generation Dead
Bill Hughes

Vampire Literature, at least since Le Fanu’s ‘Carmilla’ ( 1872 ), has been conspicuously about ‘Otherness’, that crucial term of identity politics, and has thus rendered itself most obligingly to interpretation in terms of those politics. In a concise survey of the history and problems of identity politics, Cressida Heyes says

in Open Graves, Open Minds
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Serving the people in Fruit Chan’s Dumplings
Glennis Byron

the central feature of global culture today is the politics of the mutual effort of sameness and difference to cannibalize one another Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large Identity politics has been the primary focus of

in Globalgothic
Queering the queer Gothic in Will Self ’s Dorian
Andrew Smith

argument, he claims that Self’s ‘identification as straight’ colours how gay culture is represented in the novel. 3 For Alderson, Self perceives the attempt to establish a gay identity politics as ‘delusional’ (327) because it is imbricated by a consumerist ideology which renders it complicit with Thatcherite economics. This means that seemingly anti-establishment figures, such as

in Queering the Gothic
Open Access (free)
Speaking of Ireland
Colin Graham

discussion of the strategies of writing about Ireland in relation to the critical ‘self’ which becomes implicated in that ‘Ireland’. I examine the role which the ‘warmer memory’ of ‘the people’ crucially undertakes in the processes of a criticism which takes to itself or asserts identity politics, and discuss the ‘organic’ necessities of Norquay_03_Ch2 32 22/3/02, 9:46 am 33 Speaking of Ireland the intellectual as they are reacted against and reconstructed in Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus. Barthes’ Michelet, my argument goes, exemplifies the fact that ‘crossing marginality

in Across the margins
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Operational whiteness
Wan-Chuan Kao

unwanted or unexpected’. 118 And if whiteness is never absolute, singular or static, whiteness studies is always ‘full of holes and contradictions’. 119 In our moment of renewed focus on race relations in the twenty-first century, assumptions and questions of what whiteness is and means have occupied critical discussions. If whiteness had hardened into an identity politics defined

in White before whiteness in the late Middle Ages
Author:

This ground-breaking book analyses premodern whiteness as operations of fragility, precarity and racialicity across bodily and nonsomatic figurations. It examines works such as The Book of the Duchess, Pearl, The King of Tars and others, arguing that while whiteness participates crucially in the history of racialisation in the late medieval West, it does not denote or connote skin tone alone. Deploying diverse methodologies, the book asks how premodern whiteness as a representational trope both produces and delimits a range of medieval ideological regimes: courtly love and beauty, masculine subjectivity, Christian salvation, chivalric prowess, labour and consumption, social ethics or racialised European identity. The ‘before’ of whiteness, presupposing essence and teleology, is less a retro-futuristic temporisation – one that simultaneously looks backward and faces forward – than a discursive figuration of how white becomes whiteness. Fragility delineates the limits of ruling ideologies in performances of mourning as self-defence against perceived threats to subjectivity and desire; precarity registers the ruptures within normative values by foregrounding the unmarked vulnerability of the body politic and the violence of cultural aestheticisation; and racialicity attends to the politics of recognition and the technologies of enfleshment at the systemic edge of life and nonlife, of periodisation and of racial embodiment. If whiteness has hardened into an identity politics defined by skin tone alone, this book argues that it has not always been so. Operations of whiteness may generate differences that fabricate, structure and connect the social world, but these operative differences of whiteness are never transparent, stable or permanent.

Henry James’s Anglo-American ghosts
Andrew Smith

This chapter investigates how representations of spectrality reformulate a model of national identity in Henry James. It shows that readings of haunted houses and hotels in several of James's works reveal how the historicity of the spectral expresses a nationally liminal Anglo-American identity politics. It also notes that a persistent theme of money and spectrality exists, which is familiar from Dickens, Riddell and Collins, and relates to conceptions of economic and national power and powerlessness.

in The ghost story, 1840–1920
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Queer theory, literature and the politics of sameness
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In its contributions to the study of material social differences, queer theoretical writing has mostly assumed that any ideas which embody 'difference' are valuable. More than this, where it is invoked in contemporary theory, queerness is often imagined as synonymous with difference itself. This book uncovers an alternative history in queer cultural representation. Through engagement with works from a range of queer literary genres from across the long twentieth century – fin-de-siècle aestheticism, feminist speculative fiction, lesbian middle-brow writing, and the tradition of the stud file – the book elucidates a number of formal and thematic attachments to ideas that have been denigrated in queer theory for their embodiment of sameness: uselessness, normativity, reproduction and reductionism. Exploring attachments to these ideas in queer culture is also the occasion for a broader theoretical intervention: Same Old suggests, counterintuitively, that the aversion they inspire may be of a piece with how homosexuality has been denigrated in the modern West as a misguided orientation towards sameness. Combining queer cultural and literary history, sensitive close readings and detailed genealogies of theoretical concepts, Same Old encourages a fundamental rethinking of some of the defining positions in queer thought.

Rethinking verbatim dramaturgies

Responding to the resurgence of verbatim theatre that emerged in Britain, Australia, the United States and other parts of the world in the early 1990s, this book offers one of the first sustained, critical engagements with contemporary verbatim, documentary and testimonial dramaturgies. Offering a new reading of the history of the documentary and verbatim theatre form, the book relocates verbatim and testimonial theatre away from discourses of the real and representations of reality and instead argues that these dramaturgical approaches are better understood as engagements with forms of truth-telling and witnessing. Examining a range of verbatim and testimonial plays from different parts of the world, the book develops new ways of understanding the performance of testimony and considers how dramaturgical theatre can bear witness to real events and individual and communal injustice through the re-enactment of personal testimony. Through its interrogation of different dramaturgical engagements with acts of witnessing, the book identifies certain forms of testimonial theatre that move beyond psychoanalytical accounts of trauma and reimagine testimony and witnessing as part of a decolonised project that looks beyond event-based trauma, addressing instead the experience of suffering wrought by racism and other forms of social injustice.

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Theatre and the politics of engagement
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This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.