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Understanding Production, Humour and Political Context through Nice Coloured Girls (1987) and The Sapphires (2012)
Benjin Pollock

How Indigenous Australian history has been portrayed and who has been empowered to define it is a complex and controversial subject in contemporary Australian society. This article critically examines these issues through two Indigenous Australian films: Nice Coloured Girls (1987) and The Sapphires (2012). These two films contrast in style, theme and purpose, but each reclaims Indigenous history on its own terms. Nice Coloured Girls offers a highly fragmented and experimental history reclaiming Indigenous female agency through the appropriation of the colonial archive. The Sapphires eschews such experimentation. It instead celebrates Indigenous socio-political links with African American culture, ‘Black is beautiful’, and the American Civil Rights movements of the 1960s. Crucially, both these films challenge notions of a singular and tragic history for Indigenous Australia. Placing the films within their wider cultural contexts, this article highlights the diversity of Indigenous Australian cinematic expression and the varied ways in which history can be reclaimed on film. However, it also shows that the content, form and accessibility of both works are inextricably linked to the industry concerns and material circumstances of the day. This is a crucial and overlooked aspect of film analysis and has implications for a more nuanced appreciation of Indigenous film as a cultural archive.

Film Studies
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This is the first book-length study of one of the most significant of all British television writers, Jimmy McGovern. The book provides comprehensive coverage of all his work for television including early writing on Brookside, major documentary dramas such as Hillsborough and Sunday and more recent series such as The Street and Accused.

Whilst the book is firmly focused on McGovern’s own work, the range of his output over the period in which he has been working also provides something of an overview of the radical changes in television drama commissioning that have taken place during this time. Without compromising his deeply-held convictions McGovern has managed to adapt to an ever changing environment, often using his position as a sought-after writer to defy industry trends.

The book also challenges the notion of McGovern as an uncomplicated social realist in stylistic terms. Looking particularly at his later work, a case is made for McGovern employing a greater range of narrative approaches, albeit subtly and within boundaries that allow him to continue to write for large popular audiences.

Finally it is worth pointing to the book’s examination of McGovern’s role in recent years as a mentor to new voices, frequently acting as a creative producer on series that he part-writes and part brings through different less-experienced names.

Steve Blandford

, centre of black struggle, and a real estate goldmine’ (Knox, 2011). In the same piece it is confirmed that McGovern’s role in the series is to oversee the work of ‘indigenous Australians’ and also that the production of Redfern Now will create 250 jobs in the Australian television industry, most of them for indigenous people. It is clear, then, that right up until the time of writing, McGovern is continuing with a trajectory that has seen him work more and more on projects that provide opportunities for emerging writers, often from marginalised communities. In the case

in Jimmy McGovern
Melodramatic and moral readings of gay conversion therapy in A Place to Call Home
Alley-Young Gordon R.

2018 (S6E10). However, closing the couple’s storyline with same-sex marriage suggests that the socio-political struggles of LGBTQ+ people have ended when Australia in 2018 had not yet federally banned SOCE, LGBTQ+ people still faced violence/death, and health care challenges faced by LGBTQ+ Indigenous/Australians of colour remain unaddressed ( Power, 2017 ). Similarly, ending James’s storyline with his death in 1986 from AIDS memorialises a

in Diagnosing history