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, ‘ “Not everyone can be a Gandhi” ’. 13 Iredale, ‘Luring overseas trained doctors to Australia’; Barnett, ‘Foreign medical graduates’; Wright & Mullally, ‘ “Not everyone can be a Gandhi” ’. 14 Mejia, ‘Migration of physicians’, p. 214. 15 Ibid. 16 ‘Soviet medical degrees “recognition sought” ’, Hindustan Times (8 May 1963), p. 3. 17 V. Robinson & M. Carey, ‘Peopling skilled international migration: Indian doctors in the UK’, International Migration, 38:1 (2000). 18 Robinson & Carey, ‘Peopling skilled international migration’, p. 95. 19 Ibid. 20 Robinson

in Migrant architects of the NHS
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the capital. The concerns of the Home Office, expressed in a Ministerial Statement to the House of Commons in May 2012, emphasised how ‘[M]uch of the UK’s TB burden is attributable to international migration. Around three quarters of TB cases in the UK occur in those born outside of the UK’.5 This has been echoed in most of the mainstream media where the ‘foreignness’ of the disease has been underscored in all the lamentations and calls to action. Once acknowledged as a persistent scourge, a regrettable resident within the British population, the disease was thought

in The English System
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Writing the history of the ‘International’ Health Service

. Simpson, A. Esmail, V. S. Kalra, S. J. Snow, ‘Writing migrants back into NHS history: Addressing a “collective amnesia” and its policy implications’, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 103:10 (2010); J. M. Simpson, ‘Reframing NHS history: Visual sources in a study of UK-​based migrant doctors’, Oral History, 42:2 (2014). 9 OECD, International Migration Outlook 2015 (Paris:  OECD Publishing, 2015), p. 111. 10 L. Doyal, G. Hunt, J. Mellor, ‘Your life in their hands: Migrant workers in the National Health Service’, Critical Social Policy, 1 (1981); L. Ryan, ‘Who

in Migrant architects of the NHS
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anxieties about Chinese immigration and an endangerment of ‘American-​ ness’ in the United States. For Gussow, leprosy was framed as a disease of racially ‘inferior’ people. According to Gussow, the association of this rediscovered leprosy with biblical and medieval leprosy led to the stigmatization of the leprosy sufferers, their isolation, and segregation policies. Thus, Gussow made explicit links between the stigmatization of leprosy and racial fears spreading worldwide at the end of the nineteenth century owing to international migration movements. Questions of health

in Leprosy and colonialism

Revised Edition (Sydney: Brandl & Schlesinger, 1997), p. 77. Garrard, The English and Immigration, p. 24. Aristide Zolberg, ‘Matters of State: Theorizing Immigration Policy,’ in Charles Hirschman, Philip Kasinitz and Josh De Wind (eds), The Handbook of International Migration: The American Experience (New York: Russell Sage, 2000), 71–93. For example: Tobias Brinkmann, ‘“Travelling with Ballin”: The Impact of American Immigration Policies on Jewish Transmigration within Central Europe, 1880–1914,’ International Review of Social History, 53 (2008), 459–84; Tobias

in The English System