Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 186 items for :

  • "intervention" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Anne Ring Petersen

Mining the museum in an age of migration Migratory aesthetics and artists with a migrant background can have various points of entry into museums, galleries and collections. The genre of artists’ interventions is one of the most important in this regard because of its critical, transformative and bridge-building potential. After a brief introduction to the practice, this chapter examines interventions by three artists, Fred Wilson, Yinka Shonibare and Rina Banerjee, who all take a critical de- and postcolonial approach to the institutional structures and spaces

in Migration into art
Abstract only
Kimberly Lamm

that reflect feminism’s wide, disparate, and contested reach as well as the serious interventions demanded by the sign woman and the narrow range of appearances and meanings assigned to it by a dominant visual culture that prioritises masculinity. The other woman touched upon throughout this book is a figure for the aspiration to imagine women beyond their subordinated status as the others of patriarchal cultures, which started to become increasingly obsolete in the 1970s, but continued to ‘live in the heart and in the head and transmitted over generations,’ as

in Addressing the other woman
Abstract only
Anne Ring Petersen

figure, to an understanding of the artist as a networked and migratory one who adapts pragmatically to the predicaments and opportunities of a globalised art world and tactically navigates its transnational institutional and economic power structures. As Chapter 4 demonstrated, artists’ interventions can be used as a critical tactic to navigate institutional structures. It can be powerfully transformative, too, as it can help us envision what a more inclusive museum for the age of migration could be like. Postcolonial perspectives and critiques have played a vital role

in Migration into art
Abstract only
Transcultural identities and art-making in a globalised world

Migration, understood as the movement of people and cultures, gives impetus to globalisation and the transculturation processes that the interaction between people and cultures entails. This book addresses migration as a profoundly transforming force that has remodelled artistic and art institutional practices across the world. It explores contemporary art's critical engagement with migration and globalisation as a key source for improving our understanding of how these processes transform identities, cultures, institutions and geopolitics. The book also explores three interwoven issues of enduring interest: identity and belonging, institutional visibility and recognition of migrant artists, and the interrelations between aesthetics and politics, and its representations of forced migration. Transculturality indicates a certain quality (of an idea, an object, a self-perception or way of living) which joins a variety of elements indistinguishable as separate sources. The topic of migration is permeated not only with political but also with ethical urgencies. The most telling sign of how profoundly the mobility turn has affected the visual arts is perhaps the spread of the term global art in the discourses on art, where it is often used as a synonym for internationally circulating contemporary art. The book examines interventions by three artists who take a critical de- and postcolonial approach to the institutional structures and spaces of Western museums. The book also looks at the politics of representation, and particularly the question of how aesthetics, politics and ethics can be triangulated and balanced when artists seek to make visible the conditions of irregular migration.

Ariella Azoulay

documents is to account for what has already passed, from the point of view of the present, of this ‘pastness’ that we are relegated to being confined to. Although this is the most common mode of thinking about the archive, it does not reflect the way people interact with archives. As good citizens, we are expected to conceptualise the archive abstractly as if working by itself without the contingency of people’s intervention in its functioning, i.e. from a sovereign point of view, we are engaged in identifying with the archive as what the archive is –​a shrine of the

in Image operations
Abstract only
Dominic Johnson

forms: painting, sculpture, and graphic art’ (Johnson 2015: 19). By commencing the action with a stunt that implicated the Hochschule, Ulay would use the ensuing theft to comment on a series of inequities in German art and culture, including the institutional marginalisation of performance art and other experimental practices, of which Ulay was an established pioneer. Without expecting or presuming that the establishment might endorse his actions, Ulay would directly associate his intervention directly with spaces of art beyond the museum, by quoting – or in his 66

in Unlimited action
Abstract only
Dominic Johnson

4 Impossible things You can’t force a story that doesn’t want to be told. (Eileen Myles, Chelsea Girls) Anne Bean’s work is formally enigmatic and materially hidden – or occulted – from view. It seems it cannot properly be found in history or identified through the cognitive habits encouraged by art criticism, for, taken together, Bean’s performances, public interventions, drawings, videos and writings are actively pursued as a ‘continuum’, and she strives to diminish the distinctiveness or iconicity of each in favour of a democracy of forms and effects

in Unlimited action
Art schools and art education
James Moore

schools from the tyranny of the South Kensington, the response of the Liverpool artists to the municipal plan suggested a continuing antipathy to state intervention in the direction of art education. The reality was, however, that art schools had always operated on broadly commercial lines, while the importance of their business made government intervention in their management inevitable. They attempted to attract students from local communities and provide a service to local business engaged in artistic trades, yet the government required them to fulfil a broader

in High culture and tall chimneys
From Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry to British Romantic art
Author: Hélène Ibata

The challenge of the sublime argues that the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain could be seen as a response to theories of the sublime, more specifically to Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757). While it is widely accepted that the Enquiry contributed to shaping the thematics of terror that became fashionable in British art from the 1770s, this book contends that its influence was of even greater consequence, paradoxically because of Burke’s conviction that the visual arts were incapable of conveying the sublime. His argument that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting, because of the mimetic nature of visual representation, directly or indirectly incited visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and even new or undeveloped pictorial and graphic media, such as the panorama, book illustrations and capricci. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and the inadequacy of their endeavours, and thus drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. By revisiting the links between eighteenth-century aesthetic theory and visual practices, The challenge of the sublime establishes new interdisciplinary connections which address researchers in the fields of art history, cultural studies and aesthetics.

Jenny Lin

,让城市更美好/Nongmin rang chengshi geng meihao) on the wall of a construction site near the Rockbund Museum (Figure 4.5). The Cai Guo-Qiang, Peasants—Making a Better City, a Better Life, realized in conjunction with the exhibition “Peasant Da Vincis” at the Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai, China, 2010. 4.5 138 Above sea graffiti acknowledged an overlooked aspect of the PRC’s breakneck urbanization, calling attention to the devalued migrant labor that fuels Shanghai’s development and makes possible flashy events like the World Expo. Cai GuoQiang’s urban intervention functioned in part

in Above sea