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Open Access (free)
Tuur Driesser

monitoring device to enable quick detection of pandemic threats – in particular in relation to bioterrorism – and subsequent intervention. Here, this case of the PathoMap as a monitoring device will serve to explore some questions concerning maps and temporality. In particular, the argument will emphasise not the representation of time through maps, but rather the way in which maps themselves affect, direct and produce time. Promoting the Picturing Place project at the University College London ‘Urban Laboratory’, Campkin, Mogilevich and Ross (2014: no pagination) write

in Time for mapping
Owain Jones

Introduction This chapter explores the way that pragmatic approaches offer hope for developing the interventions needed to respond to the ecological crisis, and the wider crisis that is modern knowledge. The overall argument is that pragmatic approaches, along with a family of non- and anti-representational approaches, are inherently creative. They embrace the fact that they are generative of the world and within the world. They are ecological philosophies of change and innovation and this places them at odds with modern knowledge which, with its reductive

in The power of pragmatism
The case of Ortobello Urban Garden
Giuseppe Aliperti and Silvia Sarti

consideration of these elements seems to be fundamental in order to identify and categorise the forms of urban gardening. The involvement of the local community plays a key role for the success of urban gardening. In particular, a successful initiative will allow citizens to contribute to its creation, development and improvement. De facto, citizens will be able to see the urban garden as a public service, in which they may have an active role of intervention. Citizens’ involvement in the realisation and the use of urban gardening may be linked to the concept of co

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Abstract only
Private greed, political negligence and housing policy after Grenfell

As the tragedy of the Grenfell Tower fire of 14 June 2017 has slowly revealed a shadowy background of outsourcing and deregulation, and a council turning a blind eye to health and safety concerns, many questions need answers. Stuart Hodkinson has those answers. Safe as Houses weaves together Stuart’s research over the last decade with residents’ groups in council regeneration projects across London to provide the first comprehensive account of how Grenfell happened and how it could easily have happened in multiple locations across the country. It draws on examples of unsafe housing either refurbished or built by private companies under the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) to show both the terrible human consequences of outsourcing and deregulation and how the PFI has enabled developers, banks and investors to profiteer from highly lucrative, taxpayer-funded contracts. The book also provides shocking testimonies of how councils and other public bodies have continuously sided with their private partners, doing everything in their power to ignore, deflect and even silence those who speak out. The book concludes that the only way to end the era of unsafe regeneration and housing provision is to end the disastrous regime of self-regulation. This means strengthening safety laws, creating new enforcement agencies independent of government and industry, and replacing PFI and similar models of outsourcing with a new model of public housing that treats the provision of shelter as ‘a social service’ democratically accountable to its residents.

Joe Gerlach

Nodes, ways and relations; co-ordinates and vectors for thinking through everyday mapping and participatory cartographies. This chapter attempts a narration of a day’s mapping with OpenStreetMap (OSM) in the town of Witham, England. Animating the mundane movements, sensibilities and temporalities charged through mapping, the chapter is a modest intervention in recent critical cartographic discourse that in itself, looks to chart a re-enchantment with maps of late. Thinking alongside Henri Bergson, the chapter suggests that the time-travelling potential of vernacular mapping lies not so much in the vestiges of a chronological temporality, but in the durational lines of cartography.

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

global social change have achieved ‘common sense’ status, and how they have been discursively employed to enable particular interventions to be made. This has primarily been an exercise in the politicisation of global restructuring, and the understanding of social change on which it is predicated. A first step in such an exercise involves the opening up of space for the discussion of alternative forms of political representation and, I have argued, this step can be taken via an exploration of the webs of power, tensions and contradictions that grip contemporary

in Globalisation contested
A pragmatist responds to epistemic and other kinds of frictions in the academy 
Susan Saegert

Introduction A specific incident a few years ago sharpened for me the distinction between individual ignorance that can be corrected by learning in community and ignorance as a product of certain ways of knowing in certain communities. Students of colour (SOC) in the PhD programme where I teach organised an intervention around how the practices and conditions of their education actively ignored their experiences. Similar events were occurring in other universities, colleagues told me. Following a year of discussion within the SOC group about the experience of

in The power of pragmatism
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

representation has emerged as a bestpractice that is lauded by international agencies such as the OECD. A particular set of meanings of globalisation are produced through the discourse and concrete interventions of a restructuring programme. Hence, globalisation and restructuring are not separable as ‘outside’ cause and ‘inside’ effect. Nor is the programme of restructuring ever complete, uncontested or without contradictions. Flexible workers and a flexible labour market rest upon an array of social practices that translate, enable or confound the policy programme. Viewed in

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

an edited version of the past: events and experiences can be edited and recombined, forming new patterns of memories, but also frequently hide the editorial processes that were employed to make the stitch-work! The first two chapters are mostly concerned with artistic interventions that use digital tools to map past time, and find new ways of producing stories through them, much in the same vein as the smell maps of Kate McLean seek to make narrative accounts of smellscapes. However, unlike McLean’s work, they empathise the sutures instead of temporal flow. Rachel

in Time for mapping
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

Deutschland’ in the globalisation debate In chapter 3 I argued that so-called ‘models’ of national capitalism are less coherent and more contradictory than they are commonly presented. In short, a ‘model’ of capitalism is imagined, produced and reproduced over time, enabling certain claims to be made about the nature of social reality, while impeding others. Drawing on a number of studies using Foucault’s concept of ‘governmentality’, it was argued that governmental interventions (in our terms, programmes of restructuring) rely and rest upon the making of specific

in Globalisation contested