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A Tongan ‘akau in New England
Ivan Gaskell

Library and Peabody Museum Press, 2013). 14 See the Peabody Museum Website, www.peabody.harvard.edu/node/747. Accessed 30 May 2016. 15 Peabody Museum e-Newsletter, June 2016, www.peabody.harvard.edu/node/ 2658#story_3. Accessed 30 May 2016. 16 Hawaiian artist, Kū, breadfruit wood, early nineteenth-century, Gift of John T. Prince, 1846, Peabody Essex Museum, E12071. On this point, see T.K. Tengan, ‘The Return of Kū? Remembering Hawaiian Masculinity, Warriorhood, and Nation’ in L.R. Graham and H.G. Penny (eds), Performing Indigeneity: Global Histories and Contemporary

in Curatopia
Curatorial bodies, encounters and relations
Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu, Moana Nepia and Philipp Schorch

’, Museum Anthropology, 33:2 (2010), 105–24. 13 T.K. Tengan, ‘The Return of Kū? Re-membering Hawaiian Masculinity, Warriorhood, and Nation’, in L.R. Graham and H.G. Penny (eds), Performing Indigeneity: Global Histories and Contemporary Experiences (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 2014), pp. 206–46; T.K. Tengan, ‘The Return of Kū’, in E Kū ana ka paia: Unification, Responsibility and the Kū Images (Honolulu: Bishop Museum, 2010). 14 S.M. Kamakau, The Works of the People of Old (Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1976), p. 136. e He alo aˉ he alo / kanohi

in Curatopia
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Technique and the lives of objects in the collection
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

Partnership, 1972); A. Warhurst, ‘New extension’, Communication (Victoria University of Manchester newsletter) (October 1977), 10. S. Moser, Wondrous Curiosities: Ancient Egypt at the British Museum (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), p. 2. For recent contributions to the interdisciplinary historiography of display, see R. Hoberman, ‘In quest of a museal aura: turn of the century narratives about museumdisplayed objects’, Victorian Literature and Culture, 31 (2003), 467–82; S. G. Kohlstedt, ‘Masculinity and animal display in nineteenth-century America’, in A. B

in Nature and culture
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Artefacts and disciplinary formation
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

, ‘Introduction to the ethnology collections at the Manchester Museum’, Museum Ethnographers Group Newsletter, 20 (1987), 76–83. Wilson, The British Museum; cf. M. McAlister, ‘“The common heritage of mankind”: race, nation, and masculinity in the King Tut exhibit’, Representations, 54 (1996), 80–103. Alberti, ‘Molluscs, mummies and moon rock’; A. R. David (ed.), The Manchester Museum Mummy Project (Manchester: Manchester Museum, 1979). MMRs (1972–77); MMCA, box CA6/1. MMCA, box CA5, leaflet guide, ‘O! Osiris, Live Forever’, 1979; North West Sound Archive (hereafter NWSA) 1982

in Nature and culture
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Katherine Fennelly

institutional framework of the asylum in secondary literature. Australian historian Lee-Ann Monk argues, for example, that male keepers in Australian asylums in the Victorian period reinforced masculine gender dominance in the asylum, through the authority inherent in their position and their assertion of patient control through physical action. Thus, keepers asserted their masculinity among other keepers, as well as over the patients (Monk 2003 : 70–1). In the same volume on Australian asylums and madness, Dolly MacKinnon includes the activity of keepers and nurses in the

in An archaeology of lunacy