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Abstract only
Sara Upstone

have been Asian writers in Britain for almost as long as there have been Asians in Britain: since the seventeenth century.3 In the wake of mass migration from the 1950s, however, for the first time there exist in large numbers Asians born in Britain or settled since childhood and, now as a result, British-born or British-raised Asian authors. This book focuses on the works of fiction produced by this new generation. Its central contention is that such authors, who have emerged only in notable numbers in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, mark the

in British Asian fiction
Anne Ring Petersen

differing views on the relative importance of rights and responsibilities, liberty and authority, equality and hierarchy. These differences are products of centuries. They will not soon disappear. They are far more fundamental than differences among political ideologies and political regimes.49 One of the problems with Huntingtonian isolationism and cultural relativism is that it disregards the mass migration in evidence today, and the fact that, in diasporic conditions, people are often obliged to adopt shifting and multiple positions of identification. According to

in Migration into art
Tim Rowse

training; to allow individuals to shift their land entitlements from one tribe to another; and to include fishing among activities banned on the Sabbath.34 The petitioners also wanted to know their rights to hunt. Thus these documents illustrate a moment of renegotiation, by Jones and his colleagues, of the political terms of certain Indians’ co-​existence with their colonial masters. Before mass migration, the ‘silver chain’ of British-​Indian friendship had made Indians allies, not subjects, of the Crown.35 Then settlement on a massive scale made Indians the Crown

in Colonial exchanges
Abstract only
Anne Ring Petersen

phrase ‘the age of migration’ does not imply that migration is something new, as human beings have always migrated. However, the character of migration changed with the beginnings of European colonial expansion in the sixteenth century. This reached a peak between the mid-nineteenth century and the First World War with the mass migrations from Europe to North America. While this period was mainly one of transatlantic migration, the movements of people that began after the Second World War, and which have increased dramatically from the 1980s onwards, have involved all

in Migration into art
Anne Ring Petersen

and contesting publicly what signals belonging, not only in terms of skin colour, ethnicity and legal citizenship but also in terms of the symbols, views, lifestyles and possessions by which subjects identify themselves as individuals and as members of communities – and by which they are also identified by others. Quoting Stuart Hall, Yuval-Davis observes that globalisation has produced ‘the multicultural question’, meaning that globalisation and international mass migration has turned the question of how people can live together in difference into one of the most

in Migration into art
Musicking in social space
Nick Crossley

rhythms of the Rastafarian communities that had been flourishing on the island from the 1930s (Bradley 2000 ). Over time, this musical form morphed from ska into rocksteady and eventually reggae (Bradley 2000 ). Reggae was almost exclusively concentrated within Jamaica at first. The country's island status and the low geographical mobility of reggae's ghetto-bound enthusiasts constrained diffusion. Reggae had no means of traversing geographical space. However, mass migration to the UK during the 1950s and 1960s, instigated by a UK government keen to tackle

in Connecting sounds
Abstract only
Sara Upstone

‘are squishily affirmative’.11 Such readings obscure the assertions of self which the novel develops that define a distinct progression towards a more hopeful, positive future. What critics such as Hussain rightfully recognise, however, is an unresolved tension in Ali’s narrative. The majority of the novel echoes the conventional – and somewhat clichéd – model of alienated migrant subject most associated with postcolonial fiction. Dealing with the relatively late mass migration of Bangladeshis to London, which only reached its peak after the 1962 Immigration Act

in British Asian fiction
Amy Bryzgel

Culture Centres, a group of Zagreb artists aimed to push this initiative further to see if it was possible to create a purely nonhegemonic, autonomous space. For a brief period from 1978 to 1980, Dalibor Martinis and Sanja Iveković opened their studio to their colleagues and fellow artists as a collaborative artist-run space, called Podroom – the Working Community of Artists. 23 By this time, the effects of self-management socialism could be seen across Yugoslavia, not only in its lavish consumer culture but also in the mass migration out of the country, as those

in Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960
Abstract only
Mark Edele

book which emerged from it, explored the effects of peasant mass migration to the cities during the First Five-Year Plan, picking up a topic both Lewin 34 and Fitzpatrick had explored. 35 Hoffmann argued that while the migration of some 23 million peasants to the cities could not be controlled by the state, and looked chaotic to outsiders, it was guided by existing peasant traditions, established migration paths, and networks of people from the same region. This was a classical revisionist argument, showing that while state control failed, social self

in Debates on Stalinism
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The end of International Relations?
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

North had sent their people to countries in the South; after World War II, an increasing number of people travelled the other way. During the 1990s this migratory flow was increasing so fast that demographers began to talk about a ‘new Great Migration’. As a result of it, hundreds of thousands of immigrants from the South accumulated in the cities in Western Europe and the USA. The result was not only Lyotard’s ‘postmodern condition’ of multicultural choice; the mass migration also triggered new social tensions. Critics of immigration and of the multicultural

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)