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A paradox
Sarah Salih

a royal hall (Figure 5): Camelot ’s world has one source of power and authority, the monarchy, not the dual powers of lordship and church of medieval history. The Winchester Round Table is perhaps the most interesting of the objects, for it is an artefact which neatly encapsulates the multiple media and times of Arthurianism. It was probably made in the late thirteenth century for an Arthurian

in Medieval film
Linguistic difference and cinematic medievalism
Carol O’Sullivan

]), pp. 152–227. 2 Medieval film has been defined in a number of ways, and potentially covers an enormous range of films engaging with medieval history, texts, characters and/ or themes; see, e.g., Martha W. Driver and Sid Ray, ‘Preface: Hollywood knights’ in Driver and Ray (eds), The Medieval Hero on Screen: Representations from

in Medieval film
Abstract only
Anatomy of a metaphor
John M. Ganim

-known Kurosawa film, Throne of Blood (1957), sets Shakespeare’s Macbeth in medieval Japan, also recalling the noir world of betrayal, ambition, murder, a recursive plot and a devious and manipulative female character. If Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood combines Shakespeare’s version of medieval history with certain noir characteristics, it is certainly a nod to an earlier filming of

in Medieval film
Andrew Higson

is a story chosen for its ability to address current concerns. The filmmakers thus use a version of medieval history in Kingdom of Heaven to address twenty-first-century tensions between East and West, Islam and Christianity – yet they managed to invoke the wrath of conservatives in both camps. On the one hand, they received death threats from Muslim activists who saw any revival of the crusader

in Medieval film
Marcia Landy

, Condottieri uses myth and allegory differently from Lang’s spiritualised treatment of the hero’s life and death. What has been generally considered worthy of comment about the film is its partisan, if not propagandistic, appropriation of Italian medieval history and, as many critics and viewers have commented, its evocation of the figure of Benito Mussolini through the figure of Giovanni delle Bande Nere. 21

in Medieval film
Timing The Birth of a Nation
Anke Bernau

democracy’. 7 Unsurprisingly, therefore, Jefferson was also an ardent proponent of teaching early medieval history, law and Anglo-Saxon at the newly emerging universities of North America. 8 Underlying such views of the early medieval – specifically Anglo-Saxon – origin of American institutions was the ‘germ theory’, proposed in the 1880s by the historian Herbert Baxter Adams, under whom both Woodrow

in Medieval film
Peter Marks

. 49 John Aberth, A Knight at the Movies: Medieval History on Film (London, Routledge, 2003 ), p. 24. 50 Ibid ., p. 25. 51 Ibid . 52

in Terry Gilliam
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Andrew Smith

This chapter introduces the ghost story, which previously incorporated a wide range of serious social issues. It examines the development of the belief in ghosts from the medieval period to the eighteenth century. It then tries to explain how to read the spectre, before ending with a detailed summary of the next eight chapters.

in The ghost story, 1840–1920
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An economic theory of the ghost story
Andrew Smith

This chapter examines a theory of spectrality that relates it to a specific field of economics. It shows that the connections between economics and the ghostly relate to the perception of paper money, at a time when such promissory notes were redeemed for gold. It reveals that paper money was previously considered as spectral money (not ‘real’), and like ghosts had a liminal presence. This chapter also aims to present a new theorisation of the spectral that allows a re-reading of the economic contexts of the nineteenth century.

in The ghost story, 1840–1920
Sight, money, and reading the ghost story
Andrew Smith

This chapter summarises Charles Dickens's view of the ghost story. It presents some close readings of A Christmas Carol, ‘The Signalman’ and ‘A December Vision’. In A Christmas Carol, Dickens uses ghosts to critique the economic system and to pardon capitalism. In ‘A December Vision’, Dickens tries to represent the ghost of the industrial economy as it spreads poverty throughout the country. Finally, it shows that Dickens's fascination with the allegorical mode of the ghost story and the ways such allegories can be read are addressed in ‘The Signalman’.

in The ghost story, 1840–1920