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Political group portraiture and history painting

4 Reforming pantheons: political group portraiture and history painting This chapter shows how group portrait paintings could recast political events as part of a celebrated national narrative. It contrasts, therefore, with the previous two chapters, which focused on how portraits could function as aides-memoires to political partisanship or identity. Group portrait paintings and derivative prints commemorated reforming triumphs through the aggregated representations of individual politicians. In doing so they presented a country of progress and enlightened

in Politics personified
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This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

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individuals while ignoring others, in order to support a specific conclusion. Drawn from real life, the author of the narrative provides his own meaning for the lived experience that may be a tale he tells to his family, a portion of his memoir or a novel about war. Similarly, the author draws from life events in order to create fictional narratives that rely on similar literary archetypes that are employed when telling a tale, writing a memoir or penning a novel. White argues that human beings are predisposed to organize factual details into coherent narrative wholes in

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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married for forty years, to marry Watson, after a long friendship with him and with Hildegarde. After Watson’s death, she was married a third time, to a childhood friend, Sterling Dean, in a marriage that lasted fifteen years, until his death in 2000. In preparation for our first meeting, she wrote a five-page memoir, which she read aloud to me when I visited her in January 2001. She spoke about Sibley’s involvement with The Dial, and about her own early career as a watercolour portraitist of children. She recalled Kathleen McEnery, and had known her children, Joan and

in Austerity baby
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narratives at different stages of life. Today, I seem inclined to take England’s side against any criticism (especially, perhaps, by an American). But not so long ago I put quite a bit of energy into my own demonising of England – the other side of my idealising of ‘America’, perhaps. In 1976, my father wrote a short memoir of his own, reflecting on his experiences in Germany in the 1930s, recording the increasing problems that he Atlantic moves [5] confronted in his work as a chemist and the growing isolation in his everyday life. Towards the end, he expresses his

in Austerity baby
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to leave Austria for France after the Anschluss of 1938, was arrested trying to cross the border near Saarbrücken, and taken to the city’s prison. In his memoir, A Strange Haircut, he tells the story in comedic form, though he was kept there for weeks, and eventually sent to Dachau. He was released when his brother got him a visa to emigrate to England. His account of the prison, and of his two cell-mates, is cheerful throughout. Sunday night was very much the same. It had been an uneventful day. Bill and Bob had enjoyed their three after-meal-smokes. They had

in Austerity baby
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sulphuric acid, super-phosphate and a range of organic chemicals for the textile and leather industries. My father had just completed his PhD in chemistry from the University of Berlin, and started work at ORACEFA in February 1930, the day after his final exam. He describes the job in his 1976 memoir. My title was that of Lab and Works Chemist, and the job was initially concerned with production control. Later I was given the Analytical Department and technical correspondence with foreign representatives and licensees, particularly customers’ service and analysis of

in Austerity baby
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, was orange – in the form of a line of washing hanging one morning in the basement kitchen/dining room, announcing our housemate’s expected decision that she had joined the Bhagwan. A shared domestic life – five adults and two children – begun four years earlier, tailed off rather pathetically at that point. As for the colour – the new sannyasin, who left for India soon after the washing episode, wrote in her 2007 memoir: Someone once asked Bhagwan why we had to wear orange. He explained it was the traditional colour for sannyas, the colour of sunrise signalling the

in Austerity baby
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Leonie Kahn, Offenburg 1918 Hauptstraße 85a, Offenburg, September 2014 Memorial stone for Leonie Kahn, Offenburg Tante Leonie [ 116 ] By 1937, they were at a different address (Hildastrasse 57a). On 10 November 1938, the day after Kristallnacht, Sigmund was arrested and sent to Dachau; he was released on the 22nd. By then, as my father records in his short memoir, it had become imperative for those family members still in Germany to try to leave. His parents decided to emigrate shortly after the attack on their home on Kristallnacht. They moved to Offenburg in

in Austerity baby
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J.W.M. Hichberger

Allan Ramsey Skelley, The Victorian Army at Home , 1977. 3 J. W. M. Hichberger, ‘Military Themes in British Painting, 1815–1914’, unpub. doctoral thesis, University of London, 1985. 4 Lady Eastlake, Memoir of Sir Charles Eastlake , 1870, p. 147

in Images of the army