Jessica L. Malay

The Lady Anne Clifford’s Memoir, 1603 2 In Christmas I used to go much to the Court, and sometimes did I lie in my aunt of Warwick’s1 chamber on a pallet, to whom I was much bound for her continual care and love of me, in so much as if Queen Elizabeth had lived, she intended to have preferred me to be of the Privy Chamber. For at that time there was as much hope and expectation of me both for my person and my fortunes as of any other young lady whatsoever. A little after the Queen removed to Richmond she began to grow sickly. My Lady2 used to go often thither

in Anne Clifford’s autobiographical writing, 1590–1676

Lady Anne Clifford was Countess of Pembroke, Dorset and Montgomery by marriage, and by birth Baroness Clifford. Anne began her life with the expectation that she would live the typical and prescribed life of a seventeenth-century aristocratic woman - marrying into an important family. With the death of her brother Robert in 1591, the one-year-old Anne became sole heir of the vast Clifford hereditary estates in Westmorland and north-west Yorkshire. However, her status as heir was soon compromised by her father, who began legal manoeuvres to place his own brother Francis as heir. This and George Clifford's infidelities led to great strains in his marriage to Margaret Russell, which Anne describes in detail in the 1603 Memoir. George Clifford died in 1605 and by his will left some hereditary estates to his brother Francis Clifford. The will stipulated that, should his brother leave no direct male heirs, his daughter Anne would inherit these estates. Margaret Russell refused to accept the will and this ignited an inheritance dispute that would last for decades, with repercussions that rumbled on for over a century. Anne's mother led the battle to regain her daughter's inheritance in the early years of the lawsuit. Anne Clifford lived during the reigns of four monarchs and two heads of state in her long life of eighty-six years. She experienced exile and isolation as well as great political power. Anne Clifford's surviving autobiographical writing reveals her deep commitment to maintaining a record or account of her life.

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Testimony, memoir and the work of reconciliation

restitution in the courts and legislatures (such as land rights and financial payments for damages and restitution). This chapter is concerned with the personal dimensions of the reconciliation movement and has a specific interest in the ways that testimony and memoir have become vehicles for the individual and personal experiences of reconciliation in a process of interracial dialogue. These autobiographical engagements have been one of the most visible engagements with the legacies of settler colonialism in Canada and Australia in the

in Rethinking settler colonialism
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Jessica L. Malay

vast Clifford hereditary estates in Westmorland and north-west Yorkshire. However, her status as heir was soon compromised by her father, who began legal manoeuvres to place his own brother Francis as heir.2 This and George Clifford’s infidelities led to great strains in his marriage to Margaret Russell, which Anne describes in detail in the 1603 Memoir. In this early part of Anne’s life she lived as a fledgling courtier, often sleeping near Queen Elizabeth in her aunt Anne Russell’s chamber. From this vantage point she witnessed the exercise of political power that

in Anne Clifford’s autobiographical writing, 1590–1676

3 The hell at the heart of paradise Introduction: more writings from L’Hôpital Chirurgical Mobile No. 1 Mary Borden published The Forbidden Zone in 1929, more than ten years after the armistice.1 Long before this  – indeed, even before the war itself had ended  – Agnes Warner’s My Beloved Poilus had appeared in her home town of Saint John, New Brunswick.2 But it was one of Borden’s trained nurses, Ellen La Motte, who produced the earliest memoir of L’Hôpital Chirurgical Mobile No. 1. The Backwash of War was published by Putnam’s in New York in 1916.3 The book

in Nurse Writers of the Great War

memoir of the war with a foreword in which she described how, in the mid-1930s, she had rediscovered her diary: a ‘record of the year 1918’, wrapped in a small French tricolour. At this point, Europe seemed to be moving inexorably towards another war, and her fear that warfare would threaten the future of her five-year-old son prompted her to write a book, somewhat eccentrically entitled I Saw Them Die.5 True to its title, the book contains numerous references to horrifying deaths in French military hospitals. Millard writes of the power of a long-forgotten diary to

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
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Unconventionality and queerness in Katherine Everett’s life writing

3 Bricks and Flowers: unconventionality and queerness in Katherine Everett’s life writing Mo Moulton Katherine Everett’s 1949 memoir, Bricks and Flowers, narrates a remarkable life. Born into the Anglo-­Irish gentry in the 1870s, Everett (1872–1953) escaped an abusive mother by moving to Britain as a teenager. Her memoir describes an art-­school education, life as a single mother and a career as a building contractor, to name only a few of the highlights. The question of Everett’s sexuality is never directly addressed, though for the modern reader it hovers in

in British queer history
Absolute monarchy

France with stability. The erosion of the nobility’s influence on government led to civil war – the Fronde (1648–53) – when members of the high nobility attempted to resist this encroachment on their power and privileges by the monarchy.Their subsequent defeat enabled the crown to advance a programme of reform that exploited the king’s emergency powers, nullifying the nobility as a threat to produce order. When embarking upon his personal rule in 1661 Louis began to write his Mémoires, which offered a manifesto of his views on government. This fascinating insight into

in Ideas of monarchical reform

place until actually shelled out of their cellar by German gas shells, and invalided home. They were decorated for their heroism, being made Chevaliers of the Order of St Leopold (a Belgian decoration) and awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem and the British Military Medal.19 Romance also featured in Knocker’s story. During her time in the ‘Cellar-House of Pervyse’, she met and married the Baron Harold de T’Serclaes de Rattendael, a Belgian pilot with ‘an air of recklessness and gaiety’.20 The Baroness de T’Serclaes’s memoir, Flanders and Other Fields, reads

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)

Introduction Introduction Introduction We have only two substantial eyewitness accounts of the life of Martin Luther. Best known is a 9,000-word Latin memoir by Philip Melanchthon published in Latin at Heidelberg in 1548, two years after the Reformer’s death.1 In 1561, ‘Henry Bennet, Callesian’ translated this pamphlet into English; the martyrologist John Foxe adopted Bennet’s text into his Memorials verbatim, including a number of the Englisher’s mistranslations. For example, where Melanchthon wrote that Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Castle

in Luther’s lives