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Catherine Millet, Virginie Despentes

its author’s status as editor of the respected magazine Art Press . The success of this work undoubtedly has much to do with its status as the erotic confession of a notably intellectual woman; but this does not by itself account for the book’s popularity. For Millet’s text also owes its success to the highly contemporary aesthetic drama it plays out – a drama all about contact and distance. An erotic memoir can hardly fail

in The new pornographies
Documentary form and audience response to Touching the Void

Touching the Void, and its story of disaster and survival against the odds carried huge emotional clout for some commentators and audiences. But the film is also significantly different from the format of Rescue 911 and its imitators. Firstly, Simpson and Yates do not constitute the family unit preferred by such shows. (Despite Simpson devoting his memoir to Yates for saving his life, their friendship has in fact waned in the years since the climb, as noted in numerous press articles about the film.) Secondly, Simpson’s story is largely one of self-rescue, of endurance

in Watching the world
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between people’s experiences. The monstrousness of a collapse into sameness, where everyone would experience things and remember them in exactly the same way, was touched on in Marker’s Mémoires pour Simone . It is by acknowledging, rather than denying, these necessary distinctions and specificities that the drive towards connectedness is established. Fur and scales come to matter as much as human flesh in Marker’s various

in Chris Marker
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A queer and cartographic exploration of the Palestinian diaspora in Randa Jarrar’s A Map of Home (2008) and Him, Me, Muhammad Ali (2016)

order to illustrate the ideological biases and inconsistencies of national and diasporic Arab Muslim communities and the complex predicament of living out queer, Arab, and Palestinian identities in America. Jarrar’s fiction often mobilises first-person narrators with more or less autobiographical intent, hence exploiting the interstices between fiction and memoir and assembling genres. Dwelling on the role of Palestinian memoir in dialogue with Norbert Bugeja’s work, Lindsey Moore observes that ‘[t]‌he self is historicized through his

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film

in different ways in Sans Soleil (1982), 2084 (1984), and L’Héritage de la chouette (1989). Additionally, the latter, a television series, constitutes Marker’s first sustained use of video in his filmmaking. Yet these, and especially the other films of this period ( Junkopia (1981), AK (1985), and Mémoires pour Simone (1986)), retain their connection to earlier media technologies. Marker’s work of the 1980s is

in Chris Marker
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direction. While it is adapted from a literary work, this time the precursor is not a classic novel but Mariane Pearl’s heartfelt memoir of her husband’s life and hideous death. Whereas with the adaptation of a novel the filmmaker can feel as free as he likes in which elements of the antecedent text he chooses to emphasise, in relation to the filming of a real-life story, and a tragic one at that, one is reminded of David Lodge

in Michael Winterbottom
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movies, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning , Isadora , The Gambler and Dog Soldiers/Who’ll Stop the Rain ). It also accounts for a private mystery. In her vivid and engaging memoir, The Memory of All That , Betsy Blair writes she fell in love with Karel not just on account of his charm and wit and intelligence, but because “I know I’ll always be interested in him, intrigued by him.”’ 5 For Lambert

in Karel Reisz
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Doing what you want to do

desperate search for Pearl (Dan Futterman) [a Wall Street Journal reporter and Winterbottom’s third journalist protagonist] before the release of the appalling video showing him being beheaded. It is told largely through the eyes of and based on a memoir by his widow, Mariane. 5 This is not, it seems, merely an exciting

in Michael Winterbottom
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Stardom and literary adaptation

Pedigree. The blurring of the boundaries between Simenon and his creature culminated in 1951 with the publication of Les Mémoires de Maigret, in which, in an extraordinary mise-en-abîme, ‘Maigret’ describes his relationship with the author who created him, while the latter explains that he deliberately drew the policeman as a simplified, instantly recognizable silhouette, ‘that gradually became fleshed out with details’.5 Maigret as celeactor Like all adaptations, the screen versions of Maigret are the site of ongoing negotiations between the literary text and mise

in French literature on screen
Sous les pieds des femmes and Vivre au paradis

Rachida Krim (1997) and Vivre au paradis by Bourlem Gherdjou (1998), two first feature films set in part during the time of the Franco-Algerian war; Le Gone du Chaâba (1998), a feature film by white director Christophe Ruggia, but faithfully adaptated from Azouz Begag’s 1986 autobiographical coming-of-age novel, set in a bidonville (shanty-town) outside Lyons in the mid-1960s; and Yamina Benguigui’s highly acclaimed documentary triptych, Mémoires

in Reframing difference