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for a regular salt tax which had precipitated rebellion in Ghent in 1447. Olivier de la Marche, Mémoires , i, pp. 487–504 Chapter 28 [De la Marche begins by describing how the Pope had sent a knight to Duke Philip to report on the sack of Constantinople in May 1453: how the church of

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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. 37 M. Jones (ed. and trans.), Philippe de Commynes. Mémoires. The reign of Louis XI (Harmondsworth, 1970); R. Van Uytven, ‘La conjoncture commerciale et industrielle aux Pays-Bas bourguignons: une récapitulation’, in Duvosquel et al. (eds), Les Pays-Bas bourguignons , pp. 435

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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year of my visit … The famine was the worst which had ever been known, and it was followed by a dreadful plague which devastated many places. Olivier de la Marche, ‘L’estat de la maison du duc Charles’, in H. Beaune and J. d’Arbaumont (eds), Olivier de La Marche: Mémoires , 4 vols (Paris, 1883–88), iv, pp. 1

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530

Fleece , in Mémoires , ed. Beaune and d’Arbaumont, iv, pp. 158–89. My sovereign lord, 49 my prince and master, I, Olivier, lord of la Marche, unworthy first chief steward of your noble household, place in your noble hand, as chief of the Order of the Golden Fleece, this epistle which I have written for the reasons set out below

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Jousts, shooting fraternities and Chambers of rhetoric

Lettenhove (ed.), Jan van Dadizeele: Mémoires (Bruges, 1850), p. 3. 5 For Flanders (French-speaking in particular), see Van den Neste, Tournois . 6

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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’, PCEEB 24 (1994), pp. 19–35. 5 A. de La Grange, ‘Les Entrées des souverains à Tournai’, Mémoires de la Société historique et littéraire de Tournai 19 (1885), pp. 5–321, at pp. 32

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530

657 and 661. L. Levillain, Examen critique des chartes mérovingiennes et carolingiennes de l’abbaye de Corbie. Mémoires et documents publiés par la société de l’Ecole des Chartes (Paris, 1902 ), pp. 213–18; a charter by Clothar III from 661 exempting Corbie from paying tolls ( ibid ., pp. 218–20); and a charter by

in Late Merovingian France
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] 116 Remission granted to Guillaume le Févre, bourgeois of Paris and fishmonger, giving the false reasons the Parisians revolted against the king D. F. Secousse, Recueil de pièces servant de preuves aux mémoires sur les Troubles excités en France par Charles II dit le Mauvais, Roi de Navarre et comte d’Evreux (Paris, 1755), 2 vols., I

in Popular protest in late-medieval Europe

-2; Pierre Salmon, Memoires , ed J. A. C. Buchon (Collection des Chroniques Nationales Françaises, xxiv, 1826 ), 21-2. 2 The biblical allusion is to Joshua 2.i. The two sons of the earl of Arundel had been committed on 12 October 1397 to the custody of the dukes of Exeter and Norfolk ( CPR

in Chronicles of the Revolution, 1397–1400
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The story of Joan of Arc has continued to elicit an extraordinary range of reactions throughout almost six centuries since her death. Joan of Arc was a visionary and a holy woman who claimed to be guided by God through the medium of angels and saints. Joan's enemies also tried to use her military achievements against her, denying that God would really condone such bloodshed and warfare, or even encourage the people of France to abandon their oaths to support the Treaty of Troyes. The capture and death of Joan of Arc had little direct impact on English fortunes during the war, which had reached deadlock. The accomplishments of Joan of Arc are remarkable, given that she had to overcome the significant cultural and social prejudices of a medieval society that valued men more highly than women.

in Joan of Arc