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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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Testimony, memoir and the work of reconciliation

restitution in the courts and legislatures (such as land rights and financial payments for damages and restitution). This chapter is concerned with the personal dimensions of the reconciliation movement and has a specific interest in the ways that testimony and memoir have become vehicles for the individual and personal experiences of reconciliation in a process of interracial dialogue. These autobiographical engagements have been one of the most visible engagements with the legacies of settler colonialism in Canada and Australia in the

in Rethinking settler colonialism

Ibid ., p. 21. 22 William Jardine Proudfoot, Biographical Memoir of James Dinwiddie: Embracing Some Account of His Travel in China and Residence in India (Liverpool: E. Howell, 1868), p. 27. 23 George L. Staunton, An Authentic Account of an Embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of

in Creating the Opium War
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Amherst's embassy. With his remarkable knowledge of Chinese culture and language, Morrison was able to publish A View of China 10 as well as his memoir of the Amherst mission. 11 After Morrison died, his wife compiled the two-volume Memoirs of the Life and Labours of Robert Morrison, D.D. , which complements Morrison's observations on China published in his earlier works. 12 John Francis Davis, who

in Creating the Opium War
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Comte's (1656–1729) Nouveaux mémoires sur l’état present de la Chine (1696), an influential work that was translated into English in 1697, the author spoke highly of the great empire in the East. Le Comte particularly praised the antiquity of Chinese civilisation, which he believed ‘furnishes us [the Europeans] with an infinite number of examples of conspicuous wisdom’. 34 Another monumental work, the four-volume Description geographique, historique, chronologique et physique de l’empire de la Chine et de la

in Creating the Opium War

competition with one another. In the organisation's second decade, the internationalism that they encouraged was refracted through both European and imperial lenses. That said, the events and processes of decolonisation became an increasingly important backdrop to the organisation's relief work in this period, repeatedly calling attention to Britain's global role, and to the role of the churches in that rapidly shifting international context. Janet Lacey's discussion of the Suez Crisis in her memoir A Cup of Water illustrates some of these resonances

in British civic society at the end of empire
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Portraits of the monarch in colonial ritual

One of Nieuwenhuis's works was reproduced in the major commemorative book published in the Indies for Wilhelmina's silver jubilee in 1923. 26 The queen was a great admirer of Van Heutsz, whom she feted at length in her 1959 memoir, and it is likely that she was gratified at her symbolic attendance at his career-making moment. 27

in Photographic subjects

returned from Lombok, and Wilhelmina attended veterans’ commemorations from this campaign into the 1930s. 23 Van Heutsz's military exploits in ‘pacifying’ Aceh in the early 1900s evidently left a life-long impression on her, if her memoir is anything to go by. 24 It was the Second World War, however, that arguably fixed her reputation. The eminent Dutch historian Cees Fasseur subtitled the second volume in his monumental biography of Wilhelmina ‘warlike in a formless

in Photographic subjects
The Dutch colonial world during Queen Wilhelmina’s reign, 1898–1948

Indonesian independence. When the Indonesian National Revolution proceeded to defend this proclamation, Wilhelmina was revered by the Dutch and colonial forces who fought to retain the ‘Indies’. She was a recurring motif in the polemics of renowned Indonesians who lived in the twentieth century. Her regnal milestones marked time in the memoir of an Indonesian elected to the Council of the Indies ( Volksraad ), Achmad Djajadiningrat (1877–1943), who served on this advisory body to the governor-general in the early 1930s. 6

in Photographic subjects
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., p. 26. 10 Napier, 10 Mar. 1834, ‘From the MS. Memoir Vol. 2’, Remarks and Extracts Relative to Diplomatic Relations with China, Napier and Ettrick Papers, in Melancon, Britain's China Policy and the Opium Crisis , p. 37. Napier, however, was not specific about these past experiences. 11 Napier

in Creating the Opium War
The British and Sri Vikrama Rajasinha, 1815

February 1815 The dramatic circumstances of Vikrama’s capture were recounted in a memoir by a British-employed interpreter, William Adrian Dias Bandaranayaka. 23 The operations involved D’Oyly as effective manager of the campaign, several British officers, eight hundred troops including reinforcement from India, two leading rebels, Ekneligoda and Molligoda, and other Sinhalese. An advance party, with

in Banished potentates