Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 268 items for :

  • "narrative" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

devastating. Pierre Haigneré was eight years old at the time of his family’s escape, in a raid so heavy that 500 of his neighbours lost their lives, as did another 500 local people. His distress goes some way towards answering one of the questions at the heart of any enquiry into the past: what was it like? This chapter uses the oral narratives to explore the way in which being bombed was experienced in different locations and by different children. As he told his story, Pierre oscillated between describing what happened and analysing it. The analysis is important – part of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

-makers as wholly passive. They were of great importance to Vichy’s regenerative project, and the subjects and objects of its propaganda. But Vichy was not the only source of propaganda that sought to v 183 v Explaining bombing shape children’s behaviour. The oral narratives do not show a great deal of interaction with children’s propaganda, or perhaps more accurately, interaction with children’s propaganda was not related during the interviews. Nonetheless, they do indicate some of the sources from which children gathered information, and suggest the extent of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

elderly people was ordered from Brest in February 1943. It was becoming too difficult to protect civilians from increasingly heavy raids. Yvette Chapalain was thirteen. She was sent with her younger siblings in tow to board in central Finistère. Her narrative lingered on the emotional deprivation that this separation from home had entailed, and on her residual anger. Becoming an evacuee was just one consequence of bombing in children’s lives. Air raids created acute local crises and sparked large-scale population movement, pre-emptive and responsive, voluntary and

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Open Access (free)
Christoph Menke in dialogue
Series: Critical Powers
Editor:

This book focuses on the paradoxical character of law and specifically concerns the structural violence of law as the political imposition of normative order onto a "lawless" condition. The paradox of law which grounds and motivates Christoph Menke's intervention is that law is both the opposite of violence and, at the same time, a form of violence. The book develops its engagement with the paradox of law in two stages. The first shows why, and in what precise sense, the law is irreducibly characterized by structural violence. The second explores the possibility of law becoming self-reflectively aware of its own violence and, hence, of the form of a self-critique of law in view of its own violence. The Book's philosophical claims are developed through analyses of works of drama: two classical tragedies in the first part and two modern dramas in the second part. It attempts to illuminate the paradoxical nature of law by way of a philosophical interpretation of literature. There are at least two normative orders within the European ethical horizon that should be called "legal orders" even though they forego the use of coercion and are thus potentially nonviolent. These are international law and Jewish law. Understanding the relationship between law and violence is one of the most urgent challenges a postmodern critical legal theory faces today. Self-reflection, the philosophical concept that plays a key role in the essay, stands opposed to all forms of spontaneity.

Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

’s perspective. Stories are integral to human communication and our primary means of transmitting experience. The oral narratives that comprise this book’s sources are stories; that is, they are narrated versions of parts of autobiographical memory. They are interpretations of the past. In his essay on ‘The painter of modern life’, the nineteenth-century French poet Charles Baudelaire, whose work ushered in modern(ist) ideas about subjectivity, wrote that when a work of art is viewed, what reaches that spectator is not the painter’s replication of a scene from reality, but a

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
A conclusion
Lindsey Dodd

Allied bombing on France, is to tell only a partial story. It permits civilian loss to remain obscure, and the population to remain cloaked in suspicion for their collaboration, their anti-Semitic persecution, their attentisme, their rash acts of resistance that provoked reprisals, their lies and subterfuges. But it should, however, be recognised that France was the frontline from 1939, and civilians were also victims of war. The oral narratives point towards ways in which children understand events and act in the public sphere, and the range of subjective experiences

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Open Access (free)
Christoph Menke

just like the violation it answers. The justification of retribution and its violence are indissolubly linked: Retribution is measure for measure and excess that then requires another retributive deed to restore the balance of measures. The violence of retribution consists in its necessary perpetuation: in the “frenzy of mutual murder” (Agamemnon, 1575–​76). Any retributive deed is ambivalent: It repays and repeats an excessive crime. For any retributive deed occupies two places at once in the sequence of events. There are two narratives about any retributive deed

in Law and violence
Open Access (free)
Towards a re-thinking of legal justice in transitional justice contexts
María del Rosario Acosta López

violence is 86 86 Responses therefore not merely the violence of its reproduction, but even more so the compulsion of its repetition. The question that retribution raises, but leaves unanswered, also sets the stage for the beginning and the origin of the law, the task and the challenge that will be taken up by the sphere of law as right: “is there a deed of justice whose operation does not continue without end –​that is not violence?” (p. 10) Law, according to Menke, begins with this question. It is the sphere that must conceive of justice in its narrative character

in Law and violence
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

the greatest fear. Discussed at length by experts, there was also popular interest, Mysyrowicz citing a spate of interwar novels set in the aftermath of a chemical apocalypse.16 Poison gas represented the ultimate weapon, ‘capable in a few minutes of destroying all life in a large city like Paris’.17 The French population was thus exposed, via official and unofficial channels, to future war as potential catastrophe. Yet it appears little in the personal narratives I  recorded; or at least, people remembered little of any discussions. For the younger interviewees

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Reflections on Menke’s ‘Law and violence’
Alessandro Ferrara

, for the other counts as a new offense (“the spilling of fresh blood”) calling for more retributive violence. In the justice-​of-​the-​law paradigm, however, the figure of a “non-​partisan party,” or the impartial judge, is introduced, who relativizes every narrative of violence as just “one side of the story,” normatively inert until “the other side” is offered a fair hearing. Thus the justice-​of-​the-​law paradigm reconceptualizes justice as a way of understanding “the matter in a way that is not partial 114 114 Responses but sees both sides” (p. 12). Indeed

in Law and violence