Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 55 items for :

  • "nationality" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Abstract only
Queer zen

as invoke a body that is not culturally marked. Abstraction, as Getsy writes, can ‘resist bodies’ readability and the assumptions made about gender from visual clues’.18 I would expand the latter to refer to other kinds of clues, or identifications, such as race, ethnicity and nationality. In addition to queer form, Asian American studies and literature scholar Kandice Chuh’s suggestion that we approach ‘Asian American’ in Asian American studies as a category of discursive knowledge that may or may not necessarily involve artists of Asian descent is particularly

in Productive failure

for her project, however, was the staging of a marriage with her artistic partner David Kelley. The conceptualization of getting married in Shangri-La raises several issues in regard to ‘marrying into’ nationality in the norm of obtaining citizenship based on the territorial borders of a nation. The ability to change citizenship by getting married in another country, as Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak explains, is to ‘naturalize’ and to adopt a nation as a symbol of the ‘private conviction of special birth.’5 The norm of citizenship is based on being born in one

in Staging art and Chineseness
Abstract only
Anish Kapoor as British/Asian/artist

Authorship: Anish Kapoor as British/Asian/artist I’m Indian. My sensibility is Indian. And I welcome that, rejoice in that, but the great battle nowadays is to occupy an aesthetic territory that isn’t linked to nationality. (Anish Kapoor)1 Being an artist is more than being an Indian artist. I feel supportive to that kind of endeavour … it needs to happen once; I hope it is never necessary again. (Anish Kapoor)2 Both the statements above are by India-born, England-based artist Anish Kapoor. The first was made during the opening ceremony of his first solo

in Productive failure
Open Access (free)

– planning to retain my own EU membership by becoming German as well as British. Within a week, I saw in the press that there was already a notable trend of people cashing in on their eligibility for Irish, Italian, German and other nationalities. As I write, only a month after the referendum, things are far from clear, and I suppose I won’t do anything apart from assemble my documents at least until Article 50 is triggered, beginning the formal process of separation. In the meantime, having completed this extended meditation on my family’s history, including the traumas

in Austerity baby
Abstract only

circular to headteachers urging them to ban religious insignia perceived as ostentatious precisely because, in his eyes, they did promote religion. Although the circular technically applied to symbols of any religious denomination, it was clear that the Islamic headscarf was once again the target: this was confirmed during an interview by Bayrou himself when he declared crucifixes and yarmulkes to be less ostentatious in ­comparison (Hargreaves 1995: 127). The 1990s also saw nationality, citizenship and ­immigration laws generally made more restrictive. In 1993 the

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture

, produced in India, just as India is very often, but not always, foregrounded as a cultural reference in the works. Not surprisingly, catalogue essays and reviews about art from India tend to revolve around the question of the artist’s cultural identity and ‘Indianness’. Sometimes this question is posed in a meta-reflective way, which underscores the generality and urgency of the problematic. In Zehra Jumabhoy’s phrasing: ‘What constitutes a “diaspora artist” for instance? Or, to put it another way, what makes someone “Indian”? Is it based on ethnicity, nationality, what

in Migration into art

concerned above all with issues of nationality, identity, and rights. All of these are conceived as being in volatile states of transition, and requiring translation in order to be negotiated.’2 This chapter discusses the ways in which artists may take up the challenge of producing content-driven art while negotiating the balance between local and global concerns, and translating ‘issues of nationality, identity, and rights’. There is, of course, a long history of artists participating in political action, and of making art that forms an important element in such activity

in Art and human rights
Abstract only

still practising, and inevitably changing their voice and their focus as their context changes. We can say, however, that each of these artists, like other artists in their cohort, has a very specific history, nationality, aesthetic and set of values, but each has acted as a ‘circuit breaker’ in the international art world, allowing new modes of thinking and seeing, and new modes of communication between peoples and cultures. They are all, in effect, worldmakers, because in their various ways they look closely at the contemporary order of things, and speak out  – in

in Art and human rights

location from which the artwork originated and the ostensible ‘nationality’ of the artists. Of course, art history is fundamentally a Western academic category, but in the globalization of artistic traditions, media, and practices, what is the way forward for cultural history and analyses? The term Chineseness, in coherence with terms like creolization, can function to acknowledge the ambivalence and tensions that are connected to nation-statist identifications that were largely constructed during the nineteenth-century period of colonialism and imperialism. Édouard

in Staging art and Chineseness
Performing popular culture at the Crystal Palace c.1900

seven days a week, the Palace provided a continual venue to observe its many visitors of different races and nationalities, a feature of the Palace which Kate Nichols also explores in Chapter 5. Beecroft bluntly acknowledged in his interview in 1902 that sketching in the Crystal Palace had ‘afforded unbounded opportunities for studying different races and types. I get all nationalities in this studio. You would be surprised. African, Austrian, Canadian, Indian, Japanese, Maltese, Norwegian, Russian, Tasmanian and Turkish subjects call in for a ten- the armless

in After 1851