An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse

War, a lot of people – hundreds of thousands – came to Switzerland seeking asylum. Many of them were later granted Swiss nationality. They were well integrated. Nothing like that has happened since in Switzerland. Those born after the mid 1990s – about half of the people working for SOS in Switzerland today – have never seen these supposedly ‘European principles’ in action. So for them, it’s more about defining the kind of society in which they actually want to live. Although Switzerland has always had an ambiguous and difficult relationship with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

71 countries registering a reduction in political rights and civil liberties ( Freedom House, 2018 ). All of which puts the viability of global liberal institutions increasingly in doubt. This idea of a protected place where, regardless of one’s identity (ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexuality, but also whether or not one is a dissident), one’s basic rights are secure is constitutively liberal. As fewer and fewer governments, and more and more people, view the existence of such a sanctuary within society as fanciful, illegitimate and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

2012, I organised one-day risk-analysis workshops during each of my visits (be it Colombia, Myanmar, Algeria, the Sahel or the Democratic Republic of Congo), with all of the team members – from the head of mission to support staff. I wanted to make sure the teams had a shared view of the context and of the risks taken by the organisation and by each of them, according to their individual profile (gender, nationality, ethnicity and position in the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles

Napoleon III to request a concession in Algeria, came upon the battlefield and the dying, and the spectacle shocked the fervent evangelical (he was one of the founders of the Young Men’s Christian Association, later known as the YMCA). Dunant took an active part in organising first aid for the wounded, regardless of nationality, and later wrote a gripping account of the battle, celebrating the battlefield exploits of the combatants and depicting in unvarnished detail the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

individual profiles are exposed to different levels of risk according to, inter alia, age, ethnicity, gender, nationality and sexuality ( EISF, 2018 ). In some cases, as in the bombings of ICRC and UN headquarters in Iraq in 2003, aid agencies and their staff are specifically targeted, and this could explain singling staff out from the rest of the civilian population on a case-by-case basis. However, it is not evident that the category of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Their commencement, effects and termination

restrictions upon the freedom of residents possessing adverse-party nationality. For countries which have ratified Geneva Convention IV relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, 1949, 50 civilians present in the territory of the adverse party are protected by the terms of that Convention immediately upon the outbreak of hostilities. 51 Relations between

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
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potential recognition as are the regular forces. Mercenaries Until the adoption of Protocol I no attempt was made to discriminate among the members of an armed force on the basis of their nationality or the motives which lead them to join that force, whether those motives are ideological or mercenary. 70 In view, however, of the number of mercenaries who enrolled in colonial armies

in The contemporary law of armed conflict

policy results from a complex interplay of forces involving many actors. The ECJ’s role in sports regulation illustrates these complexities. Free movement in the European Union Article 3(c) of the Treaty requires ‘the abolition, as between member states, of obstacles to the free movement of goods, persons, services and capital’. According to Article 12, for this to be achieved, ‘any discrimination on grounds of nationality shall be prohibited’. Three further Articles elaborate this goal in the specific fields of employment (Article 39), establishment rights (Article 43

in Sports law and policy in the European Union

his capture, and who had killed an American soldier, the US authorities intended trying him for murder, with the threat of the death penalty. Because of his dual Afghan and Canadian nationality, Canada sought an undertaking from the United States that this penalty would not be imposed. Protection of civilians In non-international armed

in The contemporary law of armed conflict

certain types of Dominion nationality had been created, no other Dominion had conceived a truly national citizenship. Canada had created a Canadian nationality but only with regard to re-immigration into the jurisdiction and also in relation to the appointment of Canadian members to the Court of International Justice.33 Kohn has also pointed out that ‘in several of the Dominions disabilities and restrictions had been imposed upon natives of other parts of the Empire, but these had been directed exclusively against persons of coloured race and were not designed to affect

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution