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Colin Trodd

Chapter 1 addresses the critical and conceptual conditions in which Brown developed the Manchester murals, paying specific attention to how these works responded to debates about social experience and collective life. It explains how Brown made use of Carlyle’s theory of historical representation when identifying painting with the transmission of living human expression, and it goes on to explore why he contested the model of social life and nationhood associated with academic History Painting.

in Ford Madox Brown
Colin Trodd

Chapter 1 addresses the critical and conceptual conditions in which Brown developed the Manchester murals, paying specific attention to how these works responded to debates about social experience and collective life. It explains how Brown made use of Carlyle’s theory of historical representation when identifying painting with the transmission of living human expression, and it goes on to explore why he contested the model of social life and nationhood associated with academic History Painting.

in Ford Madox Brown
Visualising a changing city

Delving into a hitherto unexplored aspect of Irish art history, Painting Dublin, 1886–1949 examines the depiction of Dublin by artists from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Artists’ representations of the city have long been markers of civic pride and identity, yet in Ireland, such artworks have been overlooked in favour of the rural and pastoral, falling outside of the dominant disciplinary narratives of nationalism or modernism. Framed by the shift from city of empire to capital of an independent republic, this book chiefly examines artworks by of Walter Frederick Osborne (1857–1903), Rose Mary Barton (1856–1929), Jack Butler Yeats (1871–1957), Harry Aaron Kernoff (1900–74), Estella Frances Solomons (1882–1968), and Flora Hippisley Mitchell (1890–1973), encompassing a variety of urban views and artistic themes. While Dublin is renowned for its representation in literature, this book will demonstrate how the city was also the subject of a range of visual depictions, including those in painting and print. Focusing on the images created by these artists as they navigated the city’s streets, this book offers a vivid visualisation of Dublin and its inhabitants, challenging a reengagement with Ireland’s art history through the prism of the city and urban life.

Julian Stallabrass

This chapter analyses three models of documentary knowledge on colour photography in the work of Luigi Ghirri, Raghubir Singh, and Susan Meiselas, who represent respectively analytic, synthetic, and experimental modes. Bound by humanism and colour, each surveys very different states of nationhood: for Ghirri, Italy at a time of deep political turmoil and then consumer quietism between the 1970s and 1990s; for Singh, a vision of synthesis amid one of the most diverse nations on Earth, recently freed from colonialism; for Meiselas, a collapsing dictatorship and the uncertain establishing of a new polity. Their different photographic solutions are set against the long denigration of colour with relation to knowledge, and to the thinking of Adrian Stokes about ‘surface colour’, a colour which for him yielded depth and knowledge and was associated with humanist painting.

in Art and knowledge after 1900

This book analyses the use of the past and the production of heritage through architectural design in the developmental context of Iran. It is the first of its kind to utilize a multidisciplinary approach in probing the complex relationship between architecture, development, and heritage. It uses established theoretical concepts including notions of globalism, nostalgia, tradition, and authenticity to show that development is a major cause of historical transformations in places such as Iran and its effects must be seen in relation to global political and historical exchanges as well as local specificities. Iran is a pertinent example as it has endured radical cultural and political shifts in the past five decades. Scholars of heritage and architecture will find the cross-disciplinary aspects of the book useful. The premise of the book is that transposed into other contexts, development, as a globalizing project originating in the West, instigates renewed forms of historical consciousness and imaginations of the past. This is particularly evident in architecture where, through design processes, the past produces forms of architectural heritage. But such historic consciousness cannot be reduced to political ideology, while politics is always in the background. The book shows this through chapters focusing on theoretical context, international exchanges made in architectural congresses in the 1970s, housing as the vehicle for everyday heritage, and symbolic public architecture intended to reflect monumental time. The book is written in accessible language to benefit academic researchers and graduate students in the fields of heritage, architecture, and Iranian and Middle Eastern studies.

Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author:

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

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Laura Moure Cecchini

popolo d’Italia , the Illustrazione Italiana , or the Domenica del Corriere della sera , very rarely represented artworks, buildings, or artists of the Seicento. The same is true for notebook covers, posters, and postcards. These ephemeral materials helped establish a sense of nationhood on the basis of a shared collective culture, and frequently included simple messages in favour of the regime. They systematically featured the classical, medieval, or Renaissance past of Italy, but they elided its seventeenth-century heritage. Only cinema was

in Baroquemania
Nationality, politics, and art in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Letters from Abroad to Kindred at Home
Leonardo Buonomo

general, her fellow Americans. She appeals to them as the citizens of a democracy born out of a revolution, and, as such, a people capable of relating to and sympathising with the Italians, then engaged in a struggle for independence and the achievement of nationhood. As a student of Italian language and culture, Sedgwick was certainly well equipped to read and interpret the Italian

in Republics and empires
The San Juan Triennial tracking the new century
Mari Carmen Ramírez

is setting out to map a new territory of cultural and artistic relations that stands above the imposed limits of geography or nationhood. Indeed, at the core of this policy shift there is a symbolic capital operation that implies the only possibility of survival for colonial peoples. I refer to the empowerment of the margins. As the periphery of the periphery, Puerto Rico

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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Beyond the binary
Tomasz Grusiecki

-versus-conservative spectrum familiar in twenty-first-century North America and Western Europe. The existence of dissimilar ideas about Polish nationhood has occasionally led to backlash, and places like Kruszyniany have served as catalysts for political polarization. On the night of 28 June 2014, for example, the village mosque fell victim to an act of vandalism. 29 Unknown perpetrators, using spray paint, marked the