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Daniel Laqua

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/18/2013, SPi 1 Nationhood It might seem counterintuitive to start a book on internationalism by considering nationalism – yet the two phenomena were mutually dependent. Internationalists evoked national arguments to solicit support for their schemes; at the same time, international congresses and associations provided staging grounds for the representation of nationhood. Be it in science, politics or the arts, internationalism depended upon the nation as a central point of reference. In this respect, any discussion of

in The age of internationalism and Belgium, 1880–1930

The subject of Britain reads key early seventeenth-century texts by Bacon, Daniel, Drayton, Hume, Jonson, Shakespeare and Speed within the context of the triple monarchy of King James VI and I, whose desire to create a united Britain unleashed serious debate and reflection concerning nationhood and national sovereignty. This book traces writing on Britain through a variety of discursive forms: succession literature, panegyric, union tracts and treatises, plays, maps and histories. Attending to the emergence of new ideologies and new ways of thinking about collective identities, The subject of Britain seeks to advance knowledge by foregrounding instances of fruitful cultural production in this period. Bacon’s and Hume’s pronouncements on the common ancestry, the cultural proximity of Britain’s inhabitants, for instance, evinces Jacobean imaginings of peoples and nations joining together, however tenuously. By focusing on texts printed in not just London but also Edinburgh as well as manuscript material that circulated across Britain, this book sheds valuable light on literary and extra-literary texts in relation to the wider geopolitical context that informed, indeed enabled, their production. By combining the historical study of literary and non-literary texts with the history of political thought and the history of the book broadly defined, The subject of Britain offers a fresh approach to a signal moment in the history of early modern Britain. Given its interdisciplinary nature, this book will appeal to literary historians and historians of early modern Britain as well as undergraduates and postgraduates.

Editor:

The need for a single public culture - the creation of an authentic identity - is fundamental to our understanding of nationalism and nationhood. This book considers how manufactured cultural identities are expressed. It explores how notions of Britishness were constructed and promoted through architecture, landscape, painting, sculpture and literature, and the ways in which the aesthetics of national identities promoted the idea of nation. The idea encompassed the doctrine of popular freedom and liberty from external constraint. Particular attention is paid to the political and social contexts of national identities within the British Isles; the export, adoption and creation of new identities; and the role of gender in the forging of those identities. The book examines the politics of land-ownership as played out within the arena of the oppositional forces of the Irish Catholics and the Anglo-Irish Protestant ascendancy. It reviews the construction of a modern British imperial identity as seen in the 1903 durbar exhibition of Indian art. The area where national projection was particularly directed was in the architecture and the displays of the national pavilions designed for international exhibitions. Discussions include the impact of Robert Bowyer's project on the evolution of history painting through his re-representation of English history; the country houses with architectural styles ranging from Gothic to Greek Revivalist; and the place of Arthurian myth in British culture. The book is an important addition to the field of postcolonial studies as it looks at how British identity creation affected those living in England.

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A New Naval History brings together the most significant and interdisciplinary approaches to contemporary naval history. The last few decades have witnessed a transformation in how this topic is researched and understood, and this volume captures the state of a field that continues to develop apace. It examines – through the prism of naval affairs – issues of nationhood and imperialism; the legacy of Nelson; the sociocultural realities of life in ships and naval bases; and the processes of commemoration, journalism and stage-managed pageantry that plotted the interrelationship of ship and shore. This bold and original publication will be essential for undergraduate and postgraduate students of naval and maritime history. Beyond that, though, it marks an important intervention into wider historiographies that will be read by scholars from across the spectrum of social history, cultural studies and the analysis of national identity.

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This England: race, nation, patriotism
Patrick Collinson

historical imperialism, so-called British history being not much more than an enriched English history.3 What in all this of English nationhood? Out of the seventeenth century emerged and expanded something called Britain, its inhabitants sometimes called Britons, who proceeded to construct a British Empire (no one ever called it an English Empire), a joint enterprise which engaged Welsh, English and Scots as partners, and the Irish as, mainly, victims. England was in the driving seat of this new enterprise, and the English have always assumed, and still do, that for

in This England
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The English nation and national sentiment in the prophetic mode
Patrick Collinson

question, where and how did it find a voice? In Forms of Nationhood,3 Professor Richard Helgerson has found various ‘forms’ articulated in those Elizabethan and immediately post-Elizabethan books which, with Shakespeare (and especially in this connection, the history plays), make up the greatest cultural monument to the span of Shakespeare’s life, the 1560s to the 1620s, books which began as ambitious undertakings and grew in substance and stature from their first editions: Christopher Saxton’s Atlas (1579–), William Camden’s Britannia (1586–), Richard Hakluyt

in This England
Margarita Aragon

turbulent degeneration or underdevelopment of other nations and peoples. The African American and Mexican writers and political actors whose ideas are considered here offered their own narratives of New World history diametrically opposed to those which claimed the supremacy of white U.S. civilization. However, they also often perceived of struggles for freedom, social transformation, and nationhood through a masculinist frame. Discourses of manhood and virility permeated the politics of resistance against U.S. violence, imperialism, and Mexican

in A savage song
Reimagining nationhood in Macbeth
Christopher Ivic

[Gruffudd ap Llywelyn], two brothers, Kings of  Wales,  and subdued that Prouince to this Crowne. 13 ‘Even on the eve of the Norman conquest’, R. R. Davies writes, ‘the title rex totius Britanniae was accorded to Edward the Confessor in one group of his charters, and his near-contemporary biographer assumed that he was the ruler of Britain, nothing less’. 14 Although Macbeth incorporates elements of the Elizabethan history plays, it engages in a profound revision of the earlier plays’ articulations of and reflections on nationhood. Much more so than Shakespeare

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
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Daniel Laqua

from Liège – expressed the intertwined nature of internationalist principles and national peculiarities: ‘An international congress is always interesting. There, one sees friends again; . . . one hears very curious opinions, both with regard to form and content, in which one senses the particular qualities of each nation despite their common base of [shared] principles.’153 Accepting nationhood as an element of internationalism, freethinkers measured national greatness through a nation’s contribution to their cause rather than in military might – and this made it

in The age of internationalism and Belgium, 1880–1930
A Scottish king for an English throne
Susan Doran

repercussions on the sense of nationhood developing in England during this period. James VI: a foreigner In polemical literature, the Stuarts’ foreign birth had always been at the centre of attempts to delegitimize their right to the English crown. As already seen, during the succession debates of the 1560s, the Protestant opponents of Mary Stuart usually presented legal, rather than religious, objections to her claim to be Elizabeth’s heir, all of which were based on the Scottish Queen’s foreign birth. Both English common law and a statute of Edward III, they asserted, For

in Doubtful and dangerous