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Louise Amoore

, the revival of IPE in the 1970s precisely coincided with the inability of conventional IR frameworks to ‘fully comprehend structural change’ (Gill, 1997: 7). IPE, by contrast, claims to offer a distinctive ontology, one that is attuned to social forces and social relations on a global scale, and also a distinctive epistemology that is ‘open’ to diverse insights on social transformation (Strange, 1984; 1994).1 Hence, as Robert Cox has it, IPE embodies inherent critical potential, an ability to ‘stand back’ from the apparent order of things and to consider ‘the ways

in Globalisation contested
Border figures of the fantastic
Patricia García

]llogical effects, so they seemed, unpredictable from whichever external point of view they were regarded’. 3 These passages show how the discursive presentation of the supernatural differs from, for example, fantasy or the marvellous. These two other non-mimetic forms introduce the supernatural as being normalised in their narrative world. In them talking animals, ghosts, miracles or elves are extraordinary, but not impossible (Roas, 2018 : 5). The fantastic, in contrast, represents an ontological and epistemological

in Border images, border narratives
Open Access (free)
Tuur Driesser

project, it takes a step back from that all-encompassing prison-house of language 226 (In)formalising to return some sense of ontological security to the territory. This is cartography as what Kurgan (2013: 34–36) calls a ‘para-empirical’ analysis: an ‘effort at once to reclaim a sense of reality, and not to imagine that this requires doing away with representations, narratives, and images’. Acknowledging the inherently abstracting qualities of representation, it re-evaluates the relationship of the map to the territory as one that is a representation, but a

in Time for mapping
Alireza F. Farahani and Azadeh Hadizadeh Esfahani

underlying processes driving development and, more recently, the representations of certain countries as ‘underdeveloped’ ( Escobar, 1995 , 2008 ; Jakimow, 2008 ). Little-d development relies on different accounts developed from Marxist and/or poststructuralist philosophies and hence there is a spectrum of ontologies and epistemologies underpinning these views. With dystopian perspectives on the condition of development, progress is denied or postponed until after total social transformation and/or revolution ( Jakimow, 2008 ). One can’t say which of these

in The power of pragmatism
Wolfgang Müller-Funk

This chapter contributes to key debates in border ontology and border anthropology through a critical re-evaluation of the work of the social theorist Georg Simmel. Through a theoretical discussion and an analysis of several border images and narratives, it argues that life at the border always involves a need to negotiate between the territorial, cultural and linguistic demands of the different spaces, revealing the instability and ambivalence of liminality. In an attempt to explore the potentiality of the theoretical frame for the study of border narratives and images, the chapter investigates various border figurations associated with limits and thresholds, often marked symbolically as bridges, staircases, windows and doors, which are part of an aesthetics of the border. The final section of the chapter addresses the film Babel (2006) directed by the Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu. It suggests that the multi-locational and multicultural elements of the film, seen in its locations ranging from Japan, the United States and Mexico testify to global cultural entanglements and the potentiality for border-crossings embedded in globalisation, but are challenged by the closed space of the tourist bus prohibiting communication between international tourists and the space travelled through.

in Border images, border narratives

This book explores contemporary urban experiences connected to practices of sharing and collaboration. Part of a growing discussion on the cultural meaning and the politics of urban commons, it uses examples from Europe and Latin America to support the view that a world of mutual support and urban solidarity is emerging today in, against, and beyond existing societies of inequality. In such a world, people experience the potentialities of emancipation activated by concrete forms of space commoning. By focusing on concrete collective experiences of urban space appropriation and participatory design experiments this book traces differing, but potentially compatible, trajectories through which common space (or space-as-commons) becomes an important factor in social change. In the everydayness of self-organized neighborhoods, in the struggles for justice in occupied public spaces, in the emergence of “territories in resistance,” and in dissident artistic practices of collaborative creation, collective inventiveness produces fragments of an emancipated society.

Luiz Eduardo Soares

, but they are reflected in Rio de Janeiro in a particularly significant fashion), and continue to be part of society only because of the echoes from a deeper, longer and more constitutive brutality of ontological dualism promoted by slavery and reiterated by the exploitation of labour, the magnitude of inequality, the distancing of the elitist state and the authoritarian nature of the hybrid and conservative capitalist modernisation of today’s Brazil. Racism provides the historical template through which class divisions are formed in Brazilian society. Violence

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins, and Clancy Wilmott

chapters implicitly reflect on Merriman’s (2011) challenge that notions of ‘space-time’ and ‘time-space’ have frequently rested on rather static conceptions. In proposing ‘­movement-space’ as an alternative, however, Merriman remains ­inattentive 2 Time for mapping to the ontological proclivities of particular digital formations. Although he does not invoke digital mapping in his re-theorisation, and although few of our authors directly cite his work, the implications of his intervention are pertinent issues consistently and carefully addressed in this book

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Louise Amoore

universality that so often surrounds ideas about globalisation is replaced by the possibility of multiple and multi-layered conceptions, each with a distinctive epistemological and ontological commitment. It is only in the most recent phase of the globalisation debate that scholars have begun to seriously address the question of divergent conceptions of globalisation. This has tended to take the form of the development of typologies or categorisations of perspectives on globalisation. Held et al. (1999: 2–10) have developed a threefold typology of perspectives – the

in Globalisation contested
Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

‘[d]eterritorialisation, in general, is one of the central forces of the modern world’. Deleuzian philosophy, it must be noted, has had a significant impact upon the ubiquity of this concept of flow within the social sciences and particularly human geography. In the words of Boltanski and Chiapello (2007: xxiv), what Deleuze and Guattari offer is ‘an ontology containing only one tier or plane (the ‘plane of immanence’)’, which ‘knows only singularities or flows, the relationship between which assumes a reticular form and whose movements and relations are governed by

in Time for mapping