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Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

or any serious philosophical scrutiny. In fact, the more philosophers have applied the gardening metaphor to tame the wilderness and its state of political animality ( Bauman, 1991 ), the more they have reduced humans to the level of wild beasts and have authored genocides in its name. And yet the ontological idea that life needs to be made partially secure by drawing upon a sovereign claim to order remains a constant in all dominant forms of political reasoning. Just walk into any natural history museum and look upon the version of the past presented with sure

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

privileging of the design principle over the need for, or even the possibility of, political change. Design Not Politics The computational turn and societal dependence on digital technologies has changed the way the world is understood and the status of humans within it ( Chandler, 2018 ). The privileging of the design principle is central to this change. Besides the spatial shift from circulation to connectivity, an ontological, epistemological and methodological translation has also taken place ( Duffield, 2018 ). While anticipating late-modernity, the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

there was an ontological contradiction. I think it is possible to work for a more democratic order – diffusing power, creating a more stable balance of power – while strengthening and democratising certain value systems. Doing so in a cooperative way, too. People might say it was just Brazil trying to extend its power and join the [UN] Security Council. But, in projecting soft power, I believe we were also promoting positive things: South–South cooperation, for example. At the ILO, it was Brazil that really initiated South–South cooperation, with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Politics, violence and resistance
Richard Jackson

live ethically, we must think and act politically’ (Campbell 1998:519). For this reason alone, I believe we have an ethical duty to resist the discourse, to deconstruct it at every opportunity and continually to interrogate the exercise of power. Importantly, the observation that large-scale political violence is a discursive construction is more than simply ontological; if a campaign of violence like

in Writing the war on terrorism
Cohesion, contestation and constructivism
Andrew Whiting

theoretical tools, but it is in this chapter that I will address and problematise established cybersecurity knowledge. With this in mind, Chapter 1 aims to achieve two objectives. First, I intend to provide an in-depth overview of cybersecurity knowledge to date that spans academic disciplines, including politics, international relations, security studies, law and computer science. When exploring this research, my aim is to draw attention to the broad ontological, epistemological and methodological homogeneity that is evidenced by a thematic trichotomy of

in Constructing cybersecurity
A Singaporean tale of two ‘essentialisms’
See Seng Tan

influence its behaviour, or passive recipients whose subjectivity is but a product of pre-existing social structures or some ontologically prior constructor/author, and who exist principally to promote the interests and preserve the wellbeing of the state and the regime which rules it. In contrast to both these essentialist interpretations, this present undertaking seeks to read

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Tarja Väyrynen

’s version of biogenetic determinism leads to irrationality of behaviour. The question is, what is the type of rationality which is postulated by Burton, and, more crucially, is that form of rationality appropriate to explaining human behaviour in the contexts of workshop entry and problem solving? A study of ontological views of Western rationality are needed to understand the concept of instrumental

in Culture and international conflict resolution
Gendered legacies and feminist futures in the Asia-Pacific
Katrina Lee-Koo

broadly. The second section examines feminist critiques of traditional security and argues that feminist theorizing has made significant epistemological and ontological contributions to the post -positivist theorizing of security. The subsequent possibilities of secure and feminist futures will be the focus of the final section of this chapter. It will explore particularly the

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Abstract only
The problématique of culture in international conflict analysis
Tarja Väyrynen

non-totalist conflict theories, culture is vital for becoming and being a moral person. Human needs theories, on the other hand, suggest that there are ontological human needs which are universal and, therewith, not relative to culture. Denying culture its constitutive role paves the way for the assumption that there are culture-free techniques of conflict resolution. Conflict and conflict resolution

in Culture and international conflict resolution
Abstract only
Andrew Whiting

on this industry, I will achieve my aims by responding to three sets of overarching questions. First, the book aims to establish the landscape of cybersecurity research to date as a means to situate my own study and determine the significance of the constructions found within this section of private-sector internet security discourse. For example, what assumptions underpin cybersecurity research? Are particular ontological, epistemological, methodological and theoretical commitments more commonplace than others? Is there a discernible homogeneity to what has gone

in Constructing cybersecurity