Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 65 items for :

  • Manchester International Relations x
  • All content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

or any serious philosophical scrutiny. In fact, the more philosophers have applied the gardening metaphor to tame the wilderness and its state of political animality ( Bauman, 1991 ), the more they have reduced humans to the level of wild beasts and have authored genocides in its name. And yet the ontological idea that life needs to be made partially secure by drawing upon a sovereign claim to order remains a constant in all dominant forms of political reasoning. Just walk into any natural history museum and look upon the version of the past presented with sure

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

. Important here is its privileging of the design principle over the need for, or even the possibility of, political change. Design Not Politics The computational turn and societal dependence on digital technologies has changed the way the world is understood and the status of humans within it ( Chandler, 2018 ). The privileging of the design principle is central to this change. Besides the spatial shift from circulation to connectivity, an ontological, epistemological and methodological translation has also taken place ( Duffield, 2018

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

approached human rights – to do with our good relations with Iran, for example. There was a tension, but I don’t think there was an ontological contradiction. I think it is possible to work for a more democratic order – diffusing power, creating a more stable balance of power – while strengthening and democratising certain value systems. Doing so in a cooperative way, too. People might say it was just Brazil trying to extend its power and join the [UN] Security Council. But, in projecting soft power, I believe we were also promoting positive things: South

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Elizabeth Dauphinée

for my trip. I arrived with a few local contacts and a decent grasp of the language. I thought that, because of this background, I was more uniquely placed to experience and appreciate a more authentic ‘truth’ of Bosnia than most researchers ever see. That sentiment quickly faded, and after several years of passing back and forth, I began to see that the arrogance of that sentiment was not antithetical to the violence I was researching. Ethics In Ethics as First Philosophy, Emmanuel Levinas argues that the ontological structure of knowledge always already involves a

in The ethics of researching war
Elizabeth Dauphinée

, because I could draw on resources that have made it before.16 9 4712P BOSNIA-PT/bp.qxd 6/12/06 15:04 Page 10 The ethics of researching war But perhaps the better task is to simply abrogate the centrality of knowledge itself (as though I, a student ineffably guided by the viole(n)t shadows of the Enlightenment, could do such a thing); to say instead that knowledge is a pompous, baseless thing, crafted itself on foundations of faith (or of faithlessness); to say instead that knowledge, and the world of onto-logic that motivates the tapping of my fingers across the

in The ethics of researching war
Towards interpretive pluralism
Cerwyn Moore

approach which addresses accounts of narrative identity does much to capture the social, cultural and ontological assumptions which inform our interpretation of war. This chapter stems from the recent contributions to theoretical debate by focusing on a turn in IR which is concerned with meaning, and which is tied into the real world relations of global politics through narratives.1 The chapter begins by acknowledging the role of radical phenomenology as one root of interpretivism – which in turn has influenced narrative. The following sections address the theme of

in Contemporary violence
Abstract only
Alternative approaches to violence in International Relations
Cerwyn Moore

of foundational epistemological and ontological assumptions. Indeed, if the most important single element in a postmodern approach is the rejection of foundational claims to know, then knowledge claims have to be made in a more self-critical, more elliptical and more cautious manner. Postmodernism (at least of the kind which informs this study of war) is above all a form of scepticism about the claims of foundational thinking rather than a particular programme of knowledge or set of methodological claims. In so far as the structure of the book represents a series

in Contemporary violence
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

stake here, however, is not the inherent, immutable characteristics so often assigned to the Other, but rather the ways in which the Other is identified that serve to excise him from the community of those toward whom we feel any sense of ethical responsibility. This, in turn, works to enshrine our own subjectivities as normatively ethical. Indeed, it is precisely the practices associated with ‘condemnation, denunciation, and excoriation [that] work as quick ways to posit an ontological difference between judge and judged, and even to purge oneself of 128 4712P

in The ethics of researching war
The road to war in the Balkans and Caucasus
Cerwyn Moore

-Chechen campaigns but which operate in contrast to the modern discourse of war associated with Western states. Such features are not captured in political discourses of identity but may be identifiable when one turns to a reading of global politics informed by social network analysis. Notwithstanding this point, a further contribution to our analysis of contemporary war can be found here in that identities are grounded in understanding, or remembering ‘being’ in ontologies. Thus identities are formed through the confluence of multiple forms of identification. In both Kosovo and

in Contemporary violence
Cerwyn Moore

cultural aspects of empire. In this way, war becomes a cultural 96 Stories of war in the Balkans and Caucasus spectacle and literature may be used to identify the various ‘structures of resistance’ and the ‘systematised’ institutional and political practices which inform the cultural dimensions of violence. In this sense, by concentrating on the politico-cultural dimensions of war, hermeneutic readings point to the ontology of experience. As a result of this hermeneutic approach meaning manifests itself in communication, in culturally constituted traditions often

in Contemporary violence