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Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

actually were allowed reformers to claim that their project was epistemological, the triumph of truth over fabulous error. Yet what it actually accomplished was the destruction of the objects that led to this truth. In the spirit of the recent theoretical return to the ontology of the object, we suggest that getting back to the medieval object in this case might well be a way to get back to the history of

in Affective medievalism
Open Access (free)
On Anglo-Saxon things
James Paz

theorists such as Jane Bennett, whose concept of ‘thing-​power’ in Vibrant Matter (2010) seeks to ‘acknowledge that which refuses to dissolve completely into the milieu of human knowledge’ while aiming to ‘attend to the it as actant’.10 Even more recently, Ian Bogost’s Alien Phenomenology (2012) situates things at the centre of being and advocates the use of metaphor in philosophy as a means of glimpsing things as they exist outside of human consciousness.11 The work of Levi Bryant (2011) puts entities at all levels of scale on equal ontological footing and Timothy Morton

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

Did it start with Bergson, or before? Space was treated as the dead, the fixed, the undialectical, the immobile. Time, on the contrary, was richness, fecundity, life, dialectic. Michel Foucault 1 The traditional ontology of the

in Affective medievalism
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Medieval and medievalist practice
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

is the vision of medievalism that holds the medieval past always already available for cultural and imaginative recuperation. Such a vision precedes and informs the medieval even before we begin to pursue it in scholarly or creative ways. Not everyone will agree with this vision of medievalism and the ontological priority we claim for it. To suggest that medievalism might be the pretext to the medieval

in Affective medievalism
Shayne Aaron Legassie

dubious ontology. A brief survey of several genres of medieval English writing suggests that the pilgrimage road served a number of artistic and ideological purposes precisely because as a concept-become-thing it could mediate between the world of ideas on the one hand and an array of material practices on the other. There is a sophisticated body of scholarship on the representation of pilgrimage in medieval English literature, yet little is written about the literary representation of the pilgrimage road.8 As an earthbound track and as path to the transcendent, as a

in Roadworks
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

, that medieval studies is hopelessly invested in a backwards-looking positivistic project, denying academic positions and futures to (younger) scholars who might be able to revivify their discipline. We have argued that the relationship between the medieval and the medievalist can no longer (if it ever could) be reduced to a simple hierarchy that could be seen as either chronologically or ontologically

in Affective medievalism
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Rationality, intelligence and human status
Irina Metzler

medieval (or other pre-modern cultures) just simply did not recognise intellectual differences. The question of how people regarded as intellectually deficient were treated socially by their respective cultures is of course the big question that interests historians most, but that does not detract from the fact that the labels (in all their, by modern ‘scientific’ standards, confusing, multifarious and rather woolly terminologies) existed in the first place. Therefore ID has an ontologically ambiguous status. On the one hand, ID exists as a real

in Fools and idiots?
Unreadable things in Beowulf
James Paz

. However, I  want to consider exactly why and how 45 Unreadable things in Beowulf 45 Hrothgar ‘reads’ the hilt and so ask what his reading of it tells us about the power that a sword-​becoming-​something-​else can have in shaping the way a literate community reads itself across time. The power of the giants’ sword can be linked to that of Grendel’s mother inasmuch as they both defy interpretation and threaten to destabilise Heorot’s shared body of knowledge. Traditional Western ontological systems would categorise Grendel’s mother and the giants’ sword as distinct

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
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Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

this section recent discussions about the importance of affect to literary study. Epistemological and ontological questions give way, in this chapter, to affective ones. Specifically, we begin with the ways in which love for the past has coloured the formation of medieval literary studies. The received narrative is based on a series of binaries. Initially an enthusiasm that supported and justified the study of the

in Affective medievalism
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The narrator in the Scottish Legendary
Eva von Contzen

University Press, 2002), p. 133. 37 They correspond to what has been termed ‘rhetorical metalepses’, i.e. very short transgressions of levels that do not involve any ontological shifts. John Pier, ‘Metalepsis’, in Peter Hühn, Wolf Schmid, Jörg Schönert, and John Pier (eds), Handbook of Narratology, Narratologia 19 (Berlin:  de Gruyter, 2009), pp. 190–203, at p. 192, calls them ‘minimal metalepses’. 38 Scottish Legendary, XXI, 621–4. 39 Scottish Legendary, XXXI, 1–4. 40 Scottish Legendary, XXXVIII, 578–81. 41 The legends that lack the final coda are Peter (I), Andrew

in The Scottish Legendary