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A world of difference
Morny Joy

ontological transformation of existence, that is, of the way that we inhabit the world (186).The crucial term for Heidegger in this new ontology is Gelassenheit or, as it is often translated, ‘letting be’ (189).This phrase indicates a way of being that does not subscribe to western rationality’s preference for absolutist principles with its binary divisions, especially those of metaphysics. Huntington then indicates that the basis of Heidegger’s new orientation is an affirmative recuperation of the term ‘fantasia’, which is posited as at once both creative and critical.5

in Divine love
Irigaray and Mary Daly
Morny Joy

otherness to which women have been consigned by what both specify as the patriarchal tradition. The future perfect tense also reclaims their own absent o/Other, according to a new constellation of ontology and transcendence. This reversal, or transvaluation of otherness, signals an attainment of a social independence and personal fulfilment for women in ways that reject a male God figure and his legitimation of women’s inferiority (Daly 1974: 19–22; Irigaray 1985a [1974]: 330–1), as well as the sacrificial demands of patriarchal religions (Daly 1974: 2–3; Irigaray1993b

in Divine love
Irigaray and Hegel
Morny Joy

of this natural identity for a distinct ontological difference for women. ‘[T] here is no more "natural immediacy". I am a sexed ontological and ontic being, hence assigned to a gender ... each gender must define and retain mediations appropriate to it’ (107).20 Unfortunately, the culture into which women have been born was not supportive of a such a female ontological identity. According to Irigaray, the task of women today is: ‘a matter of demanding a culture, of wanting and elaborating a spirituality, a subjectivity and an alterity appropriate to this gender

in Divine love
Morny Joy

Irigaray will accord the special characteristic of the new, of the extraordinary, that stimulates wonder. ‘This other, male or female, should surprise us again and again, appear to us as new, very different from what we knew or what we thought he or she could be’ (74). For Irigaray there must be two sexes to interact in pluralistic ways that witness to a new ontology. Wonder and mystery are essential components of this ontology As Irigaray attests in the opening essay of An Ethics of Sexual Difference: ‘Who or what the other is, I never know. But the other who is forever

in Divine love
Abstract only
Emmanuel Levinas and Irigaray
Morny Joy

Heidegger’s Being and Time, and considers Heidegger ‘the greatest philosopher of the [twentieth] century’, he can never forget Heidegger’s affiliation with the National Socialist Party in 1933. It is only Heidegger’s early rethinking of ontology that impressed Levinas.3 Levinas worked without scholarly prominence for many years and it is only in the last thirty-five years that his work has received acclaim in Britain and North America. It is now being mined for insights to help formulate a new orientation to ethics. Levinas wishes to reclaim a metaphysical position that

in Divine love
Morny Joy

touching and being touched at the same time. She questions the ontological status of the other person, of the one who is touching him (157). All too often this other is a woman – not necessarily erased like the mother, but ignored in men’s selfreferential reflections on reality. From Irigaray’s perspective, both of these omissions have to be repaired if women are to take their proper place in the world. Irigaray investigates different aspects of imaginative (re-) productions that would encourage women’s participation. Her first inquiry concerns the viability of

in Divine love
Morny Joy

moves beyond simply the imaginative to a more spiritually apologetic mode of writing. It will also examine Irigaray’s work in the light of recent discussions of Orientalism. Imaginative explorations In her essay ‘Divine Women’ (1993b: 57–72) Irigaray first advocated that women begin to explore ways of becoming divine, so as to counteract centuries of 124 Irigaray's eastern excursion a God made in the image of men. To become divine for women implies a fulfilment by a woman of the potentialities of her being (116–17). For Irigaray, ontologically this involves a mode

in Divine love
Abstract only
Ali Riaz

argues, ‘The individual feels bereft and alone in a world in which she or he lacks the psychological support and the sense of security provided by more traditional settings.’6 Giddens has explained this situation with two key theoretical formulations, ‘ontological security’ and ‘existential anxiety’. Ontological security, according to Giddens, is the basic need of individuals for ‘a sense of continuity and order in events, including those not directly within the perceptual environment of the individual’.7 It refers to a ‘person’s fundamental sense of safety in the

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
Christian Suhr

­turning our own assumptions so as to make it possible for us to imagine how powder – in this world – actually is power (see also Suhr and Willerslev 2012 ). Arguing for a ‘multi-ontological’ stance, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro ( 2011 : 134) suggested that anthropologists need to allow people to specify the conditions under which what they say is to be understood. According to Viveiros de Castro, this at the outset requires one to set aside one's own world as the framework through which everything else is grasped, and to attempt – at least

in Descending with angels
A new church for the unhoused
Michael Cronin

recognition of the ontological necessity of conflict in society, a notion that might on first reading appear somewhat objectionable. Conflict A substantial section of bookshops in many richer countries is given over to self-​ help manuals. Implicit in these manuals is the notion that there is an ideal self which is somewhat out of kilter because it lacks confidence, Vitamin B, the X Factor or has failed to dejunk its life. ‘I am not myself today’ implies that there is a   171 Faith, hope and clarity? unitary, consensual self which is the desirable default value for the

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism