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Exploring the session space

/innovation has been a central focus of the discourse on Irish traditional music through the 1990s to the present (Vallely, Hamilton, Vallely et al., 1999). One aspect of change has been the performance of Irish traditional music around the world, particularly in America, and the relationship between Irish traditional music and other genres (O’Connor, 2001). As a living tradition, Irish traditional music is constantly undergoing change. These changes have been influenced by social, economic and geographic transformations in Ireland and among the Irish diaspora over the past two

in Spacing Ireland
The spa in Celtic Tiger Ireland

locations of the spas and seaweed baths are shown in Figure 11.1 along with the distribution of spa establishments listed on the Spa-Ireland website.1 A number of spa and bath managers and owners were also interviewed in 2008 and 2009 on the themes discussed in the chapter. To more fully understand health practices at spas during the period of the Celtic Tiger, it should be noted that they were also framed by wider public understandings of spa settings. Spas have well-developed social and cultural identities, wherein performances of class, power and social status are

in Spacing Ireland

quality. A layered process materialises during the scenes of Robinson walking across the landscape as though it were a performance, not only as an actor in the film, but also as a routine that he performs every day over the past forty years during his method of map-making as the map-maker. In an essay in the collection Crossroads: Performance Studies and Irish Culture, J’aime Morrison recognises that Robinson has created his own ‘politics of movement’ where his movement guides his writing and the ‘narrative wanders between cartographic observation and poetic reveries

in Unfolding Irish landscapes

2 Nodes, ways and relations Joe Gerlach Here, now Maps, mappings, cartographies; (dis)orientations for the everyday, obdurate disciplinary motifs of and for geography, maligned and admired in variable measure. Cartography; a science and set of practices once pertaining to sovereign power alone, yet now increasingly diffuse in its geographic reach and performance. Nonetheless, whether rendered through hegemonic, quotidian or hybrid assemblages, mapping remains resolutely (geo)political at a range of disparate registers; statist to somatic. Elsewhere, I have used

in Time for mapping
The deep mapping projects of Tim Robinson’s art and writings, 1969–72

Nessa Cronin literature (which may extend into radio and photo essay) dealing exhaustively with a local or regional site and often linked to “vertical” or “deep” travel writing’.35 In Britain, and in performance and archaeological circles internationally, Biggs observes that the term primarily refers to ‘a site-based performance practice – known as “theatre/archaeology” or “performance archaeology” – originating with Mike Pearson, Michael Shanks, Clifford McLucas, and the radical Welsh performance group Brith Gof’.36 McLucas (1945–2002) would go on to develop a

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
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Geographies of the post-boom era

one another and the relationships that Ireland has with Europe and the rest of the world. Transformations in Ireland came into being through the political and cultural contingencies of place, the nation and the global. These forged new relationships to place, new forms of 6 Introduction settlement, and new ways of moving around. As considered in this collection, the chapters reveal the struggles and terrains of modernisation. Place became a site of consumption, performance and circulation – one shaped by concerns about transformation and the political contexts of

in Spacing Ireland
Landscape, mobility and politics after the crash

Dempsey at the opening of the M50–Southern Cross route, 2001 contributes to the reception and performance of the architecture, which is intended to uplift the car-bound spectator. Road art and mythic landscapes The intersection between the motorway and these discourses of national progress is revealed by the art provided along new roads under the Per Cent for Art Scheme – a fund that sets aside a percentage of the total cost of infrastructure, usually for sculpture. An estimated 700 pieces of sculpture funded from this scheme now adorn the side of Irish roads (Lane

in Spacing Ireland

strongly conditioned by routine. Advocates of what is referred to as the ‘performance turn’ in tourism theory have begun to explore these interconnections, proposing that ‘although suffused with notions of escape from normativity, tourists carry quotidian habits and responses with them: they are part of their baggage’ (Edensor, 2001: 61). Larsen (2008: 22), for example, considers that occasional leisure, in the form of holidaying, is informed by ‘everyday performances, social obligations and significant others’. Such researchers argue that it is through understanding the

in Spacing Ireland
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Ireland’s ‘ABC of earth wonders’

Journal of Irish Studies 38:1–2 (2014):  158–83; J’aime Morrison, ‘ “Tapping Secrecies of Stone”:  Irish Roads as Performances of Movement, Measurement, and Memory’, in Sara Brady and Fintan Walsh (eds), Crossroads: Performance Studies and Irish Culture (Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), 73–85; Daniel Sack, ‘Walking in and out of Place: the Pedestrian Performances of Tim Robinson’, in Mary P.  Caulfield and Christopher Collins (eds), Ireland, Performance, and the Historical Imagination (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), 19; Gerry Smyth, Space and the Irish

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The case for practice theory

social is a field of embodied, materially interwoven practices centrally organised around shared practical understandings’ (Schatzki, 2001: 3). This requires a separation between actions (individual performances) and practices. Here, ‘practice’ as a general term describes all human action (drawing on the German Praxis), and ‘practices’ describes complex series of embodied ways of doing and knowing, drawing on the German term Praktiken (Reckwitz, 2002). ‘[I]f practices are the site of the social – then routinized bodily performances are the site of the social and – so

in Time for mapping