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3 Theorising and analysing media performance in wartime There are two principal objectives to this chapter. In order to move beyond purely empirical analysis, the first is to describe the analytical framework that serves as the basis for our theoretically informed and systematic analysis of wartime media performance. Building initially on existing work by Hallin (1986) and Wolfsfeld (1997), the first half of this chapter synthesises a range of models, hypotheses and explanatory variables, drawn from across the literature, in order to set out a framework

in Pockets of resistance

4 Performing the border and queer rasquachismo in Guillermo Gómez-​Peña’s performance art Where Gregory Scofield’s negotiation of the practice and habitus of citizenship in Canada is focused on the Métis, a group whose rights and identity have been debated and unjustly dismissed for centuries, this chapter recrosses the 49th parallel and returns to the border between the United States and Mexico, the site that features most prominently in work by Mexican-​ American and self-​ identifying Chicano performance artist and cultural theorist Guillermo Gómez-​ Peña

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

Technology Conference . Obrecht , A. and Warner , A. ( 2016 ), ‘ More than Just Luck: Innovation in Humanitarian Action’, HIF/ALNAP Study ( London : Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action /Overseas Development Institute ). ODI ( 2010 ), ‘ The Humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

because they cannot be reconceptualised and constructed on any other basis than liberal order. Humanitarian Performance To ask what function a form of social practice performs is not to ask what it means to those who perform it. The meanings of humanitarianism to humanitarians can be multiple, but do any of these answers explain why we currently have a humanitarian system that spans the globe, ministers to millions of people every day, receives billions of dollars in income and is a major player in every crisis? More than this, it is clear that the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation

support for 145,000 children and their families all over the country’ ( Parkes, 2014 : 363), achieved without a single piece of ICT. World Vision International adapted the UNICEF-initiated community-based performance-monitoring approach to create a local social accountability model (CVA) now used in over fifty countries ( Walker, 2016 ). The second structural challenge relates to solving the difficulty of trialling experimental aspects within programme designs without compromising the ethical

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation

, B. , Scriven , K. and Foley , C. ( 2009 ), ‘ Innovations in International Humanitarian Action ’, in ALNAP 8th Review of Humanitarian Action ( London : Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action ), pp. 1 – 88 . Rudofsky

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

depending on factors like language pair, translation direction and content type. Each humanitarian crisis raises difficult questions about the priority of quality or speed. Decisions must consider the content to be translated, its criticality, sensitivity and level of perishability, the languages required, the level of performance of the MT system and the availability of linguists. All these factors suggest that preparation and advance testing are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

also now questioned. In separating itself from the failures of the past, humanitarian innovation problematises the concerted attempts since the 1990s to professionalise the aid system, especially the numerous moves to standardise humanitarian engagement through behavioural codes, ground rules, technical guidelines and performance benchmarking ( Fiori et al ., 2016 ). Reflecting late-capitalism’s disdain for independent standards and autonomous expertise, side-lining humanitarian professionalism can be seen as a necessary condition for the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
British news media, war and theory in the 2003 invasion of Iraq

This book analyses British news media coverage of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. It describes the analytical framework that serves as the basis for theoretically informed and systematic analysis of wartime media performance. The book synthesises a range of models, hypotheses and explanatory variables to set out a framework composed of three models of news media performance: the elite-driven model, the independent model and the oppositional model. It provides three case studies which, in different ways, illuminate each model of news media performance in wartime. The three case studies include the case of Jessica Lynch, the case of Ali Abbas and the case of the anti-war movement. The book then presents an account of how the relationship between foreign policy, news media and war might be expected to operate, based on current theoretical understanding. In order to place British coverage of the invasion in context, the book offers brief summaries of the structure and character of Britain's television news services and its press. The book provides an analysis of the ways in which the news media's visual depictions of the war reinforced supportive coverage. It is devoted to documenting and analysing evidence for negotiated and oppositional coverage. The book also examines the representation of civilian casualties, military casualties and humanitarian operations across both television and press, three subject areas that generated a good deal of media criticism.

This book offers a new and critical perspective on the global reconciliation technology by highlighting its contingent and highly political character as an authoritative practice of post-conflict peacebuilding. After retracing the emergence of the reconciliation discourse from South Africa to the global level, the book demonstrates how implementing reconciliation in post-conflict societies is a highly political practice which entails potentially undesirable consequences for the post-conflict societies to which it is deployed. Inquiring into the example of Sierra Leone, the book shows how the reconciliation discourse brings about the marginalization and neutralization of political claims and identities of local populations by producing these societies as being composed of the ‘victims’ and ‘perpetrators’ of past human rights violations which are first and foremost in need of reconciliation and healing.