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The ‘metropole’ and peripheral ‘others’
Chris Beasley
and
Heather Brook

temporal and cultural contexts, even as they are produced by a thoroughly 252 Global agendas globalising industry. These historically situated political myths are fundamentally uncritical and often present a synecdochal view of the world. Even the truly unique hero or protagonist thus has a solidary aspect associated with constituting belonging and identity within a political community. On this, Joseph Campbell asserted that there is one overarching mythic archetype common to all cultures – that is, the ‘monomyth’ of the ‘hero’s journey’ (Campbell, 1949: 23

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
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Chris Beasley
and
Heather Brook

targets are mass social groupings such as ‘nations, classes, ethnicities, generations, etc.’ and its primary purpose is ‘to stabilize and … unite a political community’ (Stevanović, 2008: 25 and 34). On this, Chiara Bottici argues that while political theorists appear to have for the most part neglected myth, it nevertheless has a crucial role in the preservation of a polity and in its further associations with political mobilisation (Bottici, 2010: 915). In other words, political myths can play a part in maintaining power relations and so may be deployed as a strategic

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
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Trish Winter
and
Simon Keegan-Phipps

5 The English context We noted in Chapter 1 that the surge of interest in English folk arts has happened in the context of a growing broader interest in Englishness. This has a political dimension – see, for example, the findings of the Future of Eng­land (FoE) Survey (conducted in 2011), which suggests that there has been an emergent sense of an ‘English political community’ (Wyn Jones et al., 2012: 2). English voters, the findings of the survey suggest, appear to favour ‘distinct government arrangements for England as a whole’ (Ibid.). The survey’s findings

in Performing Englishness
Jack Holland

with, it is vital to accept the importance of language, since, as Aristotle noted, political activity would cease to exist in its absence; language and politics are linked at a fundamental level. 3 In an era of instant communication, the linguistic basis of political community is arguably more apparent today than ever previously. 4 Language is key to the signalling of community boundaries and the development of shared identities, especially when those boundaries are not perfectly aligned with geography’s terra firma. Consider, for example, Bush’s appeals to

in Fictional television and American Politics
Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

out into three intimately related questions: firstly, how can we expand who we consider parts of our political communities? Secondly, what do we consider a political enunciation? And thirdly, who do we consider a speaking subject? Accordingly, I ask four related questions: is dance seen as a legitimate avenue to express politics? When does politics occur in dance? Why does politics occur in dance? What conception of political dance does this interchange yield? Those questions will reappear throughout the book in various guises as they provided me with the

in Dance and politics
Maria Rovisco

), ‘Political community, identity and cosmopolitan place’ , International Sociology 14 ( 3 ): 269–82 . Ferrão , J. ( 2002 ), ‘Portugal, três geografias em recombinação: espacialidades, mapas cognitivos e identidades territoriais’ , Lusotopie 2 : 151–8 . Fortuna , C . ( 1997 ), ‘Destradicionalização e imagem da cidade – o caso

in Cinematic countrysides
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Education, communication and film studies
James Zborowski

the hard fact underlying the mass media that continually foils dreams of democratic participation.52 Dissemination therefore becomes a necessary category of communication within large political communities. Indeed, disseminations in fact contribute significantly to the creation of a sense of community. In his 124  Classical Hollywood cinema account in the Imagined Communities of nation states (‘imagined because the members of even the smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet them, or even hear of them, yet in the minds of each lives the

in Classical Hollywood cinema
Hilary Neroni

uncommon, but Costa-Gavras's films root out the way that this distinction has a detrimental effect even on those regimes with the most egalitarian ideals. Political theorist Carl Schmitt is the leading advocate for the idea that politics revolves around a friend/enemy distinction. Schmitt theorizes that a political community exists only when a people distinguishes itself and defines outsiders by delineating a friend/enemy distinction. According to Schmitt, this creates a shared identity even among people who may have differences internally. He argues that this friend

in The films of Costa-Gavras
Carol Medlicott

), Korea Old and New: A History ( Seoul : Ilchokak Publishers ). Entrikin , N.J . ( 1999 ), ‘Political community, identity and cosmopolitan place’ , International Sociology 14 ( 3 ): 269–82 . Hausladen , G.J . ( 2003 ), ‘Where the cowboy rides away: mythic places for Western film’ , in Hausladen, G.J. (ed.), Western Places, American

in Cinematic countrysides
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Stephen Greer

’s trilogy of works concerning political community  –​Bios (2008), Communitas (2010) and Immunitas (2011) –​which dispute the popular conception of community as a place of ‘mutual, intersubjective “recognition” in which individuals are reflected in each other so as to confirm their initial identity’ (Esposito 2010: 7). Noting the etymological origins of community in the term ‘munus’, understood as a form of obligatory gift, Esposito theorises that the ‘subjects of community are united by an “obligation,” in the sense that we say “I owe you something,” but not “you owe me

in Queer exceptions