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Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

Introduction Recent interventions in visual theory claim the camera affords the disenfranchised a form of political participation through the civil space opened up by the medium, a space where creator, subject, and spectator intersect ( Azoulay, 2008 ; de Laat, 2019 ). Beyond merely being a technology for producing pictures, the camera is understood as mediating social relations, and as such is an inherently political medium. Crucial to this formulation is visibility: being seen enables participation in a political community, even if only through a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

An international research initiative run by the Development Learning Programme based at the University of Birmingham. See: www.dlprog.org/research/thinking-and-working-politically-community-of-practice.php . 9 By the same token, elites must have super-brains. 10 Since the mid 2000s, there has been a growing number of computer games and software programmes that claim to allow interested parties to experience what it is like to be a refugee or subject to a disaster. The Darfur content on Google Layers, for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Zoltán Gábor Szűcs

oppressed) groups, but this kind of representation does not seek confirmation in electoral politics. Instead, it creates some kind of representation through association, sympathy, and recognition. Accordingly, civil activists can hardly ever claim to represent the entire political community. They can only do so when they position themselves as being the true opposition of the regime

in Political ethics in illiberal regimes
Humour, subjectivity and the everyday
Alister Wedderburn

Chapter 1 develops a conceptual framework through which to understand humour’s relevance to world politics, putting forward an account of humour as a vehicle for the performative articulation and negotiation of political subjectivity. It argues that humour plays an active and constitutive role (though also an ambiguous and indeterminate one) in the creation and maintenance of subjective identity – in which capacity it also helps to shape and reshape intersubjective relations, both within and between political communities. Drawing on the laugh that underpins Michel Foucault’s The Order of Things and Michel de Certeau’s theory of everyday life, the chapter theorises humour as a ‘way of operating’: as a field of everyday practice that is both irreducible to and inextricable from the broad network of relations that comprise its social and political terrain. In so doing, it positions humour at the liminal boundary-zones of social order, revealing and sometimes contesting the exclusionary terms of belonging that underpin all individual and group identities. This understanding of humour provides the foundation for the book’s enquiry.

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

Israel and a Palestinian state
Lenore G. Martin

disaffection of Israeli Palestinians with the Israeli regime ( Amara, 2000 ). 20 So the Palestinian minority within Israel could become alienated from both political communities. Ethnic and religious tolerance National security does not require ethnic and religious homogeneity or cohesiveness. What it does require is that differentiated ethnic and religious groups avoid internecine

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Naomi Head

centrality of Habermas’s thought for theoretical debates in IR. He argues that: critical theory judges social arrangements by their capacity to embrace open dialogue with all others and envisages new forms of political community which break with unjustified exclusion. Realist and neo

in Justifying violence
Dialogue as normative grounds and object of critique
Naomi Head

strategic and communicative action draws our attention to the respective roles that coercion and reflexivi- ty play in international politics. The cosmopolitanism of Andrew Linklater develops directly out of an engagement with Habermas’s oeuvre and its application to international politics. He calls for a triple transformation of political community, grounded on a dialogic

in Justifying violence
Abstract only
Alister Wedderburn

the way I have outlined throughout this book: as Foucault’s account of grotesque power confirms, humour is often mobilised in order to reinforce rather than contest abjection ( 2003a ). 1 Yet this only goes to confirm humour’s intimacy with processes of subject formation: humour can open a window onto the construction of exclusionary political communities, as well as the subjective clefts and interstices that inevitably accompany them. In both instances, however, it is useful as a way of tracing those limits, and their everyday production and reproduction. This

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Abstract only
The nature of diplomacy
Iver B. Neumann

Diplomacy is about handling the Other. Whether it is defined as ‘the transmitting of messages between one independent political community and another’ (Bull 1977 : 164), ‘the conduct of business between states by peaceful means’ (Satow 1979 : 3) or ‘the mediation of estrangement’ (Der Derian 1987 ), the overall theme is one of establishing settings where possible conflict and cooperation may play out, and establishing ways in which to play. Traditionally, students of diplomacy looked mainly at negotiation games and their outcomes. In the phrase of G.M. Young

in Diplomatic tenses