Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 89 items for :

  • "political power" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Jemma Field

seminal essay of 1990, which she subsequently developed in numerous publications, and which has been employed by cultural and political historians as a framework for the reconceptualisation of female political power in early modern England.33 Consequently, the concept of conjugal patronage is used throughout this study to provide a richer understanding of the breadth of Anna’s interests and some of the meanings generated by her actions, associations, and possessions. This approach moves beyond the socio-cultural restrictions placed on Anna as a woman, and the way in

in Anna of Denmark
Abstract only
Activism and design in Italy
Author:

Precarious objects is a book about activism and design. The context is the changes in work and employment from permanent to precarious arrangements in the twenty-first century in Italy. The book presents design interventions that address precarity as a defuturing force affecting political, social and material conditions. Precarious objects shows how design objects, called here ‘orientation devices’, recode political communication and reorient how things are imagined, produced and circulated. It also shows how design as a practice can reconfigure material conditions and prefigure ways to repair some of the effects of precarity on everyday life. Three microhistories illustrate activist repertoires that bring into play design, and design practices that are grounded in activism. While the vitality, experimental nature and traffic between theory and praxis of social movements in Italy have consistently attracted the interest of activists, students and researchers in diverse fields, there exists little in the area of design research. This is a study of design activism at the intersection of design theory and cultural research for researchers and students interested in design studies, cultural studies, social movements and Italian studies.

Abstract only
The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author:

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.

Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author:

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Abstract only
Jemma Field

James and bestowed on Charles. FIELD 9781526142498 PRINT.indd 220 21/04/2020 11:54 Conclusion 221 More than an occasion of loss for Anna, it was a triumph of her political power as James was moved to publicly stage a post-death alliance between the Stuart and Oldenburg kingdoms: their dynastic heraldry was seen coalescing in the figure of Prince Charles and an official alliance sealed future unity between the two ruling houses. Beyond restating the centrality of Anna’s dynastic heritage to her consortship, a central aim of this book has been to reassess the

in Anna of Denmark
Abstract only
Ilaria Vanni

wider historical circumstances and transformations. In this way, the book moves between different scales of observation, remixing close-ups on the localised realities in Italy and long shots on global issues brought about by precarity. These issues are not confined to the spreading forms of temporary and insecure work, but are concerned with life in its social, cultural, affective and material aspects. Drawing on scholars writing about design activism and the political power of design, I have argued that the framework of design activism provides a vocabulary to

in Precarious objects
The ‘Special Artist’ and the ‘Italian Washington’
Melissa Dabakis

-York Tribune , Americans had adopted Garibaldi as a hero of their own. After handing over command of the Italian Southern campaign to King Victor Emmanuel II in 1860, the American press often referred to him as ‘the Washington of Italy’, a leader, like Cincinnatus (and Washington himself), who refused absolute political power and quietly returned to peacetime life. Considered the ‘new

in Republics and empires
Abstract only
Antonio Turok’s photographs of the Zapatistas
Antigoni Memou

were and are still directly correlated with the political party in power, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (Institutional Revolutionary Party, PRI). The PRI is the political party that monopolised political power in Mexico from 1928 to 2000. J. Mraz, ‘The New Photojournalism of Mexico 1976–1998’, History of Photography, 2: 4 (1998), pp. 313–65. 5 R. Blanco Moheno, Memorias de un Reportero (Mexico City: Libro-Mex Editores, 1965), p. 294, as quoted in J. Mraz, Nacho López: Mexican Photographer (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2003), p. 35. For a

in Photography and social movements
Abstract only
J.W.M. Hichberger

academy in relation to the political power-holding groups had really changed. The RA banquet continued to be patronised by the monarchy and members of the forces and government. It was only in terms of a limited elite within the elite – critics and a few patrons – that the Royal Academy lost its supremacy. This issue of audience is crucial in establishing that the pictures shown at the RA at the very least could not have been

in Images of the army
Abstract only
Lez Cooke

).1 In fact, as Helen Jewell has shown in her scholarly historical study The North–South Divide: The Origins of Northern Consciousness in England, regional concerns about the centralising of power can be traced back to the eighth century and the writings of Bede and Eddius whose ‘perception was very much in terms of political power: Bede thought of Northumbrian and Southumbrian power blocks, and Eddius wrote of southern nations united against Wilfred’s Northumbria’ (Jewell, 1994: 207–8). Regional identity has traditionally been expressed through regional accents and

in A sense of place