Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

Community engagement and lifelong learning

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Open Access (free)

creationism I usually avoided those issues. One reason why I originally enjoyed my work on societal and cultural issues in nanotechnology was because I thought there were no issues of origins and ontology in this area. There is no religious denomination that I know of that argues that atoms and molecules are unreal. But in 2007 Jamie Wetmore at Arizona State University showed me that there were indeed some issues of religious reactions to nanotechnology, and that they are important. I have circled back to questions of the sacred and the profane in science and technology

in Science and the politics of openness
Abstract only

close of the high middle-ages, however, these elements remained apart from ‘profane domains of life and experience’ (Habermas, 1997a : 214). The Reformation would change this. Weber examined the process of ethical rationalisation it set in motion. The religious asceticism that flowered in medieval monastic orders had to penetrate all extrareligious departments of life , so that profane actions were also subjected to the maxims of the ethic of conviction (which was at first anchored in religion). Weber

in Habermas and European integration
Abstract only

middle-ages, however, these elements remained apart from ‘profane domains of life and experience’ (Habermas, 1997a: 214). The Reformation would change this. Weber examined the process of ethical rationalisation it set in motion. The religious asceticism that flowered in medieval monastic orders had to penetrate all extrareligious departments of life, so that profane actions were also subjected to the maxims of the ethic of conviction (which was at first anchored in religion). Weber locates this process in the emergence of the Protestant ethic of the calling. By

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Abstract only
Where Do We Go Now?

impervious to progress. It does not bar the way to the social and political history of the societies that surround us, or of the communities whose fates we share at the national level. Like all dogmas, both sacred and profane, Islam becomes an earthly reality only through its social articulation—that is to say, as the result of a strictly human mediation. This mediation is perfectly liable to work through every kind of development and adaptation within itself—and within the bounds of necessary respect for a symbolic relationship to its founding text

in Understanding Political Islam
Abstract only
Aspects of the ‘triangular’ relations between Europeans, Muslims and Jews

out a clear message to its [the Netherland’s] Muslim citizens: whoever does not accept the Dutch secular and ultra-liberal way of life – was free to leave’.6 Profaning God is no longer a crime in the Netherlands. In November 2012 the Dutch parliament – in spite of far Right and conservative opposition – revoked the 1930s Blasphemy Law that forbade the profanation of God. The Act created another thorny issue between the Dutch people and the Muslim minority, although the law had not been enforced for the last 50 years. Criticism of Islam and its sanctities thus became

in Haunted presents

rate no good reasons for denying the possibility that religions still bear a valuable semantic potential for inspiring other people beyond the limits of the particular community of faith, once that potential is delivered in terms of its profane truth content. (Habermas, 2008c : 20) Mapping antimodernism Figure 7.3 brings together themes from the preceding reflections on modernity and its critics. In order to facilitate empirical research, heuristic principles are drawn from the earlier considerations

in Habermas and European integration

building-blocks of the Ancient cultures – manage to continue and maintain a recognized place within in the differentiated edifice of Modernity because their cognitive substance has not yet been totally exhausted. There are at any rate no good reasons for denying the possibility that religions still bear a valuable semantic potential for inspiring other people beyond the limits of the particular community of faith, once that potential is delivered in terms of its profane truth content. (Habermas, 2008c: 20) 80 C  Mapping antimodernism Figure 7.3 brings

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Abstract only

component of the ethical health of the community. I have suggested that British engagement in Africa – far away, emotional, rooted in action (ritual, even), transcendent of profane politics – resonates with the idea of a sacred core of state activity. I have also suggested that Durkheim’s ideas have an affinity with Hegel’s depiction of the idea of the good state – interpreting Hegel’s good state as an aspiration, or an ideal, separate from, and reinforcement of, the more complex real state. Throughout, the idea of utopia has constantly arisen – utopia as a representation

in Britain and Africa under Blair