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Christ; the present of Italy and the past of Italy (the Renaissance) and further back a classical past at the time of Christ; a film image and a painting; low culture and high culture; the profane and the sacred. These iconological and cultural comparisons have a musical extension: the music of the baroque Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi alternates with gypsy music. There is also a literary comparison and join: passages from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno of the thirteenth century read out in prison, a hell of its own where Ettore has been incarcerated. The noble poetry of

in Film modernism
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. 4 The annihilation of the Renaissance in The Last of England : Spring’s boot comes down on the body of Cupid in Caravaggio’s painting of ‘Profane Love’. 5 Art and authority: Soldiers posing for a painting in Imagining October

in Derek Jarman

Boy with a Basket of Fruit’ or ‘Amor Vincit Omnia’ (called ‘Profane Love’ in the film script) which show a powerful responsiveness to youthful male beauty. His Caravaggio is masochistically in thrall to such beauty but ‘the strictures of Church and society leave a cancer, a lingering doubt, which leads to dis-ease in this painter’ 6 and generates violent psychological conflicts, evident in such paintings as ‘David

in Derek Jarman

to the questions asked by the interviewers.] … with a short-term revival of the film. Often I frequented the cinema of the profane, and I must add that encountering Chaplin was my greatest experience. I do not know how much cineastes acknowledge Chaplin nowadays. But beyond the narrow scope of

in Lukácsian film theory and cinema

Caravaggio’s painting ‘Profane Love’ being rotated rapidly, followed by a longer sequence of the young man, dressed only in torn trousers and heavy boots, dancing on top of the painting and stamping his boots down on the naked Cupid. The contrast in the colouration, the educated tones of Nigel Terry’s voice-over, and our knowledge that Jarman had directed a film about Caravaggio and was an admirer of this particular painting, all

in Derek Jarman
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culture. The concept of artistic subversion is absolutely central to understanding Blier’s work: subversion in the popular tradition is about more than simply offending notions of good taste and behaviour, but is instead about an active engagement with patterns of disruption and parody, a valorising of the profane over the purely antagonistic. Popular culture has been greatly served by the analysis of traditional forms offered

in Bertrand Blier

potential collapse of the boundaries that separate self from other’ (2005: 238). Both of these ideas are pertinent and pivotal to Deadwood ’s performers’ skilful handling of the spoken word. In its distinctive melding of arcane and profane language, the series explores the borderline meeting point of civilised and wild ways. Equally, in extensive monologues and involved exchanges, its performers explore the limits of verbal

in Genre and performance
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Lancelot du lac

was it?) passes several times, the unidentified archers wreak their havoc. The king’s armour, its helmet bearing his crown, is one of a lifeless pile on the ground. Lancelot’s dying word is: ‘Guenièvre!’ – an assertion of profane over courtly love, and thus a final betrayal of the chivalrous ideal, but one which matters hardly at all, for there is nobody to hear it. Bresson’s nearest approach to an action film ends in total

in Robert Bresson
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comparison. In Mamma Roma, Ettore is compared to Mantegna’s The Dead Christ and the wedding banquet of whores, pimps and thieves to The Last Supper of Da Vinci. In La ricotta, Stracci on the cross is likened to Christ on the cross, specifically a Christ on the cross in the paintings of the Deposition by Rosso Fiorentino and Pontormo, the low like the high, the profane like the sacred, the real like the image as if in a maze

in Montage
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Writing from the dark underground, 1976–92

opportunities for the mixture of sacred and profane signifiers. Goths often ‘profane’ traditional religious iconography by using it for flagrantly stylistic rather than religious purposes.55 A similar negotiation of religion is discernible in Propaganda. The homoerotic overtones to Saint Sebastian in these images can be associated with this very same parodic homage to conventional faith, and this Goth zines -123- has a long history in relation to the saint. Oscar Wilde referred to Sebastian in a poem about John Keats, stating he was ‘Fair as Sebastian, and as early slain

in Ripped, torn and cut