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E.A. Jones

grant; and that on St Loy’s [Eligius, 25 June], St Dunstan’s [19 May] and other saints’ days, he would solemnly carry, or have carried, images of St Loy, St Dunstan, and other saints, around the public streets and profane places, attracting our subjects by giving money to them in order that

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550

indeed, and for nothing, yet this is not of no consequence, but so that it may be harmful to him who takes the name of the Lord his God in vain, as it is to a man guilty of a crime. And again, the Lord says in Leviticus: ‘Ye shall not swear by my name falsely, neither shalt thou profane the name of thy God: I am the Lord’ [Leviticus 19:12]. And holy David said in the Psalms, ‘He

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

assertion was that he had come there provided with so large a force of his followers and so great a display of military preparation when there was no need for him to fear any danger. Then of course he was hard pressed by that bishop of apostolic sanctity and Mosaic gentleness, who had consecrated his hands to God with so much bloodshed and avenged the injuries of the profaned church more savagely and more

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

their minds, not to blindness of the body’. With these and many other errors they compose profane scriptures, decking them out with some flowers of philosophers, 19 as is that book that is called The Perpendicular of Sciences : 20 insofar as heresy finds a place in the hearts of those reading it, on account of the philosophical embellishment and also some sentences of holy scripture interposed <in it>. When those who carry around books of this sort are captured, they say, excusing their wickedness, ‘Let the reader

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

-Mary-within-the-Walls, because of the place’s immunity. Showing no reverence to God Évrard broke the immunity of the church, and inside the church itself he had the man killed by sword by one of those who were hunting him, atrociously profaning God’s sanctuary with this innocent man’s blood. But the Lord, a just judge, gave him the right retribution for his merits, as we shall see in the following. Since Count Peter <of Auxerre> had become hostile to him, Évrard left him and took himself off to Hervé, Count of Nevers, to whom the county of Nevers had

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300

dissemination of diverse miracles or at least signs and prodigies, and most of all because of the apparent and presumed idolatory in a place that had not yet been consecrated. Because of all this, it could not be suffered that such a good pastor should find himself personally in a public and profane place, just as it should not be suffered by law, based on the

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530

the way to the point of madness, such that they erected idols, which they had formerly cast down, and celebrated profane and detestable festivals of their sacred rites. Meanwhile, you would have seen dramatic games performed through the whole city, mixed together with all sorts of clamour and uproar. Suddenly, the city caught fire. It was impossible to know from where it had come, but it was thought

in Noble Society

obedience, and this kindled the king’s desire for her. 16 She entered the monastery at the age of five. She did not place a foot outside of it, nor her tongue, nor her heart, and no profane word was ever heard from her mouth. The sweet infant managed her childish things so maturely that she reproved those mature in age, not by word but by example. 2. When she had grown, she abstained

in Noble Society

either struggle bravely for Christ, Christ’s laws and our holy [places] or die ignominiously. It either lies before us to die gloriously and live eternally or remains for us to submit most shamefully and by this short and shameful life to secure everlasting death. But neither in this time nor in eternity will anyone be permitted to live who does not fight against such profane and such blasphemous pagan

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
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Worms (24 January 1076) and Brixen (25 June 1080). The first, a letter in which twenty-six imperial bishops withdrew their obedience from ‘brother Hildebrand’, painted Gregory as a ‘standard-bearer of schism … eager for profane innovations’ 169 – a probable reference to Gregory’s ‘new counsels’, which entailed not only the rejection of the sacraments of unchaste or

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest