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Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers

Chapter 8: Introduction to Qualitative Data Analysis Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers Chapter overview Qualitative data includes a range of textual (e.g. transcripts of interviews and focus groups) and visual (photographic and video) data. During qualitative analysis researchers make sense of this data gathered from research. Analysing the data by looking for common themes (known as thematic analysis) is one of the most common ways in which to do this and involves examining and recording patterns within the data relating to a specific research question

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

facilitation Time to collect data, transcribe and analyse Can create challenging, alignment and differences in views Can be intimidating Require appropriate recording equipment Consider if participants might design or run their own focus group, engaging them as ‘evaluators’ in the design and running

in Creative research communication
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers

11/05/2018 16:15 Figure 22 Stages in observational work Identify a problem or phenomenon of interest How does a new system of care planning fit in the everyday routines of care practices? Choose a strategy to get in (gatekeepers) Care co-ordinators Service users • Select what to observe (key informants) Care-planning meetings Involvement activities • Develop relationships Prior meetings and discussions Undertake observation Structured recording of events Analyse observations Observe under different circumstances Model to explain what is happening Further

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

) for interaction. Thus they might be seen as primarily a tool to disseminate research findings or enhance a researcher’s career through providing a platform for their views. In contrast, virtual worlds, such as Second Life, are high on both self-presentation/self-disclosure and social presence/media richness because they allow both synchronous communication (that is, avatars can talk or communicate in writing in real time) and the opportunity for text, visual and auditory communication (through labelling, graphics and inclusion of audio or video recordings which can

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

personal insight into the rediscovery. ‘She gave me ten questions and wanted off-the-cuff answers,’ Nicholas recalls. It took two and a half hours across two sessions for Nicholas to record his responses to the questions. He sent the recordings to Jilli and then didn’t hear anything more until she had produced the final edit. ‘I wouldn’t have ended the film the way she did, but she had her reasons,’ he says, highlighting the need for researchers to be flexible when working with artists or the media. ‘Artists have different perspectives and ways of presenting

in Creative research communication