Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 48 items for :

  • "religious life" x
  • Manchester Medieval Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only

Conclusion The hospital movement of the thirteenth through fifteenth centuries in northern Italy provides a lens through which to view the transformation of political power, religious life, and the social agency of urban citizens of the region. Traditional definitions of poverty and need, as well as suggestions of a Christian’s responsibility to such need, no longer satisfied city-dwellers who saw a much greater demand and variety of suffering in their community than ever before. In addition, they felt vulnerable in the face of such need. Security for their

in Hospitals and charity
Abstract only

dramatic return to prominence of the Gospels in an astonishing proliferation of religious initiatives that sprouted in the twelfth century.14 The adherents to these initiatives shared an antipathy towards traditional monasticism, whether for its formal religion, its aristocratic snobbery, or its wealth, and they strove to live in what they believed to be greater conformity with the lives of Jesus and the Apostles.15 As one would expect of any such major reform movement, which one leading historian of the religious life has called the ‘Reformation of the Twelfth Century

in Indispensable immigrants

example, there was a group of Benedictine scholars known as the Maurists (from the Congregation of Saint-Maur, of which their abbey was the principal house), who travelled throughout France to read and transcribe medieval manuscripts.20 Out of these voyages littéraires as they called them came the dictionary of medieval Latin produced by Charles Du Cange; the classic study of the forms of medieval documents by Jean Mabillon; and the vast collections of texts on the religious life by Luc d’Achery, of royal charters by Etienne Baluze, and of liturgical texts by Edmond

in Indispensable immigrants

religious life accepted by laypeople required a massive programme of instruction and persuasion over several decades. A key part of this programme was the institution of a holiday specifically to promote the new observance. According to a pious woman at Liège early in the thirteenth century, Jesus confided to her through visions his displeasure at the lack of an annual celebration specifically dedicated to honouring the sacrament of his body and blood. Her persistent efforts on behalf of this divine wish led to the establishment of such a day in the diocese of Liège

in Indispensable immigrants

liberty; He took all the children from this life within a year.21 Although Raymond then opted for continence, his wife did not agree and so they had a sixth child, a male. Raymond took the child secretly to a church and prayed before a crucifix that the Lord not separate this child from his siblings. The divine response was instead to take the life of his wife, so at least he would engender no new children and his son could grow up to join the religious life. Raymond handed the child over to his in-laws and took off on what he thought was henceforth his true vocation

in Indispensable immigrants
Abstract only
Hincmar’s world

to 810, and northern France is the most plausible location for his birthplace.8 Hincmar himself states that he was ‘raised from the beginnings of infancy’ at the monastery of St-Denis.9 He was probably a child oblate, and thus may have been barely weaned when he first entered religious life.10 Hincmar obviously won favour with the abbot of St-Denis, Hilduin, who took him to Emperor Louis the Pious’s court, where Hilduin was arch-chaplain (head of the palace clergy), to continue his education.11 This was at some point during the early or mid820s, a formative moment

in Hincmar of Rheims
History and context

1 Hospitals and charity: history and context The hospital movement in Europe arose out of a tradition of charity and religious life that originated in the earliest days of Christianity. The perception of who deserved charity and whose responsibility it was to provide such relief changed considerably by the twelfth century as the populations of cities grew and the ability of ecclesiastical institutions to serve them diminished. The perception of personal charity shifted from the idea of caritas to misericordia. Caritas, the term employed in the earlier Middle

in Hospitals and charity
Abstract only

and governance of religious life. How and why did this custom of commendation develop throughout the early Middle Ages? How was it exercised and experienced? What did it look like and produce in practice? If the monasteries’ grand objective was freedom from outside interference, from the encroachment of secular and/​or ecclesiastical lords, then it is well worth examining the papacy’s role in achieving this outcome. If episcopal power (i.e. rights and jurisdiction) encompassed spiritual and judicial control throughout a diocese, what role did the papacy exercise

in Freedom and protection
Abstract only

donations and endowments, venerating their political and spiritual role in shaping monastic identity and culture. Representing an idealised model of localised governance anchored in the gesture and memory of foundation, it symbolises a harmonious relationship between secular rulers and the religious life. But on the other hand, this image also leaves a lot unsaid. The foundation of Vézelay and Pothières is just an opening scene. The remaining acts reveal a rich history of monastic exemption, whose privileges for the former monastery in particular came to define its place

in Freedom and protection
Abstract only

compelling characteristics of medieval urban piety was the extensive participation of women in all facets of charitable and religious life. Participation in semi-religious activities such as the administration of a hospital gave women an opportunity to engage in their community at a level that would be barred to them in any other arena. Women made up a majority of membership in the Humiliati and their activity in the administration of charity including hospitals is well documented.75 For example, Ospedale San Vitale in Como was given to the sisters of the order of

in Hospitals and charity