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Alison Morgan

of the tune and words to ‘God Save the King’ is not known. However, early versions of the song date back to Jacobite drinking songs of the late eighteenth century, which were written in support of the exiled Stuart monarch, James II. The song gained popularity in England in 1745 when a new arrangement by Thomas Arne was played at Drury Lane Theatre in support of George II following the defeat of the British by the Jacobites, led by Bonnie Prince Charlie, at Prestonpans (Ibid., pp. 60–72). 27 People devoted to a religious life. 28 Blood-soaked field – a direct

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
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Tim Shaw

-century recasting of religious life – occupied the position of keystones for pre-Reformation liturgical life and experience. However, the model of liturgical practice offered for such emulation has still not been investigated in any detail. Westminster Abbey was undergoing substantial structural expansion by the late fourteenth century, enlarging its sphere of influence to serve both its immediate surroundings (the

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
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Christine Carpenter

secular business, including the local lord’s. 41 We must conclude that, while Duffy may overdo the communitarianism of gentry religious life, the argument that their faith was divorced from that of ordinary parishioners either ideologically or physically is far-fetched. But, even if we accept that many of the gentry participated, at least to some extent, in a vibrant communal faith, it

in Gentry culture in late-medieval England
Brian Sudlow

virtue (human agency), Christian marriage and the monastic or religious life. Their commentaries thereon are heavy with implications for religious porosity, and at the same time suggest that the path back to porosity coincides with Taylor’s distinction of the ‘open’ immanent frame which describes how buffered interiority can be responsive to a transcendent meaning and purpose from without. 1 It would be wrong to reduce the complaints of the French and English Catholic authors about secular morals simply to a lament over moral decadence in

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

communities, populations in flux etc. – tended to contribute to the privatisation and compartmentalisation of religious life and to the organisation of activities by the State. Religiosity might arguably create a more favourable environment for resistance to secularisation, but, again as we have argued, secularisation is more reliably identified by the tendency to place private religious authority over the ecclesial. In this sense, the towns, with their more fragmented communities, arguably provided more propitious conditions in which secularisation could flourish

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914