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Premonstratensian canons to transform his castle into a religious house, and embarked upon a religious life. He was not unique in deciding to give away his property while a young man in order to found and join a monastic community; across Europe, other lords were also driven by the reforming spirit of the early twelfth century into seeking out religious houses where they could atone for the sins of the aristocratic

in Noble Society
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patronesses of the religious life. Other nobles, both male and female, dedicated themselves to prayer and spiritual improvement in a monastic community, while others walked a middle course between the lay and religious spheres as influential prelates who oversaw both their Christian flocks and their churches’ extensive political and territorial interests. Regardless of which roles individual noblemen and

in Noble Society
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

below. They are discussed in P. Biller, ‘Northern Cathars and higher learning’, in P. Biller and [R.]B. Dobson, eds, The Medieval Church: Universities, Heresy and the Religious Life. Essays in Honour of Gordon Leff , Studies in Church History Subsidia 11 (Woodbridge, 1999), pp. 25–53. On William, see S.E. Young, Scholarly Community at the Early University of Paris: Theologians, Education and Society, 1215–1248 (Cambridge, 2014), chapter 3 and pp. 222–3. We have translated from William of Auxerre, Summa aurea , ed. J

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300

suitable price. Indeed, we put all of this together in writing, so that we may offer it to those wanting to taste the honeycomb amassed by our most prudent bee. And so, he was inflamed by such a great desire for the religious life that there was almost no monastic order considered acceptable in his days and territories, from which he did not continually receive pious men. He entrusted to these men the leadership

in Noble Society
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

. Despy, ‘Les débuts de l’inquisition dans les anciens Pay-Bas au XIIIe siècle’, in G. Cambier, ed., Problèmes de l’histoire du Christianisme. Hommage à Jean Hadot (Brussels, 1980), pp. 71–104; P. Biller, ‘Northern Cathars and higher learning’, in P. Biller and [R.]B. Dobson, eds, The Medieval Church: Universities, Heresy and the Religious Life. Essays in Honour of Gordon Leff , Studies in Church History Subsidia 11 (Woodbridge, 1999), pp. 25–53; M. Barber, ‘Northern Catharism’, in M. Frassetto, ed., Heresy

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

The 1270s inquisition manual translated in this part provides an ideal version of the inquisitorial actions. A fundamental concern with the records has long been the truth or otherwise of what the deponents confessed when interrogated by inquisitors. Suspicion about inquisition records has its own history, especially in southern France. There is an abundance of modern scholarship on inquisition records. John H. Arnold has analysed the different voices of the records, the balance between inquisitorial categorisation and the excess of detail generated within each deposition.

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
Jews as Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries

, elsewhere in this series, by Robert Swanson, who writes, when discussing the written sources for English religious life (all Christian, of course) in the late Middle Ages: But some elements are irrecoverable, or very imperfectly recoverable: the emotional responses which were generated by participation in this continuity

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
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‘Rule of St Paul’ which was most commonly adopted. 8 The majority of these hermits retained an officially lay status, but the adoption of the habit may be treated as reflecting a crossing of the border between a secular and regular (= religious) life. For women, the options retained the secularity. Their commitment to a life of chastity, through the taking

in Catholic England

because of their supposed hostility to the younger faith and because they were suspected of conspiring with Christian heretics against Catholic Christendom. This assault on the religious life and practice of Judaism was carried out under the auspices of the Fourth Lateran Council of the Catholic Church, which, having been called together by Pope Innocent III, had issued its decrees

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
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the greater part of his religious life as an ascetic at various sites on the slopes of Mt Latrus 1 in Caria, near the city of Miletus. Later he founded a monastery there, 2 and still later crossed to the island of Samos nearby, to avoid the crowds of disciples who had followed him. The life is evidence of the presence of dualist heretics on the

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450