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Reconstruction and Soldier Settlement in the Empire Between the Wars
Author: Kent Fedorowich

Research on soldier settlement has to be set within the wider history of emigration and immigration. This book examines two parallel but complementary themes: the settlement of British soldiers in the overseas or 'white' dominions, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa, between 1915 and 1930. One must place soldier settlement within the larger context of imperial migration prior to 1914 in order to elicit the changes in attitude and policy which occurred after the armistice. The book discusses the changes to Anglo-dominion relations that were consequent upon the incorporation of British ex-service personnel into several overseas soldier settlement programmes, and unravels the responses of the dominion governments to such programmes. For instance, Canadians and Australians complained about the number of ex-imperials who arrived physically unfit and unable to undertake employment of any kind. The First World War made the British government to commit itself to a free passage scheme for its ex-service personnel between 1914 and 1922. The efforts of men such as L. S. Amery who attempted to establish a landed imperial yeomanry overseas is described. Anglicisation was revived in South Africa after the second Anglo-Boer War, and politicisation of the country's soldier settlement was an integral part of the larger debate on British immigration to South Africa. The Australian experience of resettling ex-servicemen on the land after World War I came at a great social and financial cost, and New Zealand's disappointing results demonstrated the nation's vulnerability to outside economic factors.

Kent Fedorowich

State for War, emphasised the isolation many veterans experienced upon their return to civilian life and observed that society tended to regard all ex-servicemen as a ‘peculiar class of men segregated from the rest of the community’. 32 National efficiency, the second Anglo-Boer War and reconstruction, 1900 – 14 The increasing

in Unfit for heroes
Kent Fedorowich

referred to policies in the fields of education, immigration and religion which, with the aid of time, would exert a subtle but steady influence. 2 Anglicisation was revived after the second Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902), motivated this time by the British government’s attempt to foster white racial harmony and create a new rural order in South Africa. Once again, a key ingredient within that policy was

in Unfit for heroes
John M. MacKenzie

, were inevitably a characteristic of the Zulu and frontier wars, as well as the first and second Anglo-Boer wars. This was also true of the so-called pacification period. There was, for example, a considerable military encampment with tents and huts at Middelburg in the Cape Colony.53 There are two key examples of fortified military positions in Canada whose significance survived into the twentieth century. The Citadel in Halifax, Nova Scotia, begun in 1749 and later developed into one of the great redoubts of the British Empire, was both a fortress and a great

in The British Empire through buildings
Kent Fedorowich

Bonar Law, 10 October 1915; John Grigg, Lloyd George from Peace to War 1912–1916 , London, 1985, p. 270. The kindergarten was the name given to Milner’s cadre of young Oxford graduates who were placed in key administrative positions in the reconstruction government during and after the second Anglo-Boer War. 22

in Unfit for heroes
The failure of the Anzac legend
Kent Fedorowich

-imperial soldier’. 86 Nine months later, having received no response from the Tasmanian government, Blythe vented his spleen: ‘I have been greatly deceived and my life blighted’ he told the OSC. He thought it extremely unfair for a man who had fought in South Africa during the second Anglo-Boer War, and had served five years with the Colours between 1914 and 1919, three of them in France, that the authorities

in Unfit for heroes