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Place, society and culture in a post-boom era

Ireland is a turbulent place. This book engages readers with the contours of transformation of Irish society through a series of distinct episodes and sites where change can be confronted. The content of the book intersects with the boom and bust themes to explore the economic and social implications of the recession. The processes are as diverse as cross-border development, farming knowledges, food movements, and the evolution of traditional Irish music. The modernisation of Irish society during the Celtic Tiger and its subsequent demise was a 'spatial drama' involving transformation in the material landscape and the imaginative representation of the island. The first part of the book explores the revolving intersections of identity politics with place. It tracks the discovery of the ghost estate and the ways in which it has been implicated in debates about the Irish economic crash, complicating ideas of home and community. After a discussion on immigration, the book discusses the role of migrants in filling labour and skill shortages. The second part pays attention to questions of mobility and consumption in urban and rural contexts. The new Irish motorway network, free time, leisure and holidaying in the lives of lone parents during the Celtic Tiger, and the role of National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) are discussed. The third part explores diverse cultural practices and some longstanding representations of Ireland. An autobiographical tour of the pub session, National Geographic's representations of Irish landscape and the current Irish imagination are the key concepts of this part.

Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy
Louise Amoore

to provide skilled workers is further exacerbated by the growth in the use of temporary labour and the adoption of ‘hire and fire’ practices. The editorial of an engineering management magazine illustrates the problem to good effect: ‘Some of industry has taken a careless approach to its skills base, seeming to believe it can discard and rehire people at whim, as if skills can be switched on and off like a light bulb. They can’t, and the corollary is that skill shortages don’t just occur at times when companies are recruiting: they are long-term too’ (Professional

in Globalisation contested
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Geographies of the post-boom era
Denis Linehan and Caroline Crowley

. Sally Daly picks up on the theme of Ireland’s new migrants to query other manifestations of place, experience and identity in the context of horticultural production in Chapter 3, ‘Migrants in the fields: making work pay’. Public discourse and policy debates on immigration highlight the role of migrants in filling labour and skill shortages, especially in those jobs that grew increasingly unattractive to Irish workers during the boom. Drawing upon her ethnographic research into horticulture, an increasingly specialised and technologised agricultural sub

in Spacing Ireland
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

:19 PM Globalisation contested 80 within the firm and led to talk of skills shortages in Britain (Marsden, 1995; Rubery, 1999). The ad-hoc and management-led character of the programme, coupled with the division of workers along skilled/unskilled and core/contract lines, has arguably stifled consultation and innovation in the workforce, producing a ‘low trust’ environment (Lane, 1997; Rubery, 1993: 11–12).7 The in-built paradox here, even viewed from a neo-liberal or business perspective, is that skills flexibility within the firm requires investment in training

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

natural features of German state-society – they are continually brought into question and rebuilt, and this is intensifying as the global discourse on flexibility gains ground. Second, the greatest challenge to the prevailing programme of occupational status maintenance comes from the growing sector of German society that is excluded from the provision. The costs of the dual system intensify the exiting disincentives for German firms to employ new apprentices, exerting pressure on youth employment rates and giving rise to the possibility of a future skills shortage

in Globalisation contested