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Comparing communities, challenging conceptions
Sarah Hackett

, terrorism, demographic and skills shortages, and their statuses as modern liberal democracies.2 The emergence of parallels between the two countries have additionally been accredited to the European Union and the accompanying ‘Europeanisation’ of immigration, as a result of which Christian Joppke argued at the end of the 1990s that ‘Germany and Great Britain no longer live in two separate immigration worlds’.3 Yet it has not only been Britain and Germany that have experienced a convergence in their immigration and integration policies, and the extent to which this has

in Foreigners, minorities and integration
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Developing lifelong learning for community dance practitioners
Victoria Hunter

company working in this field; the company’s mission is to demonstrate that interventions modelled on professional contemporary dance training can transform behaviour in a sustainable manner. They have developed an international reputation for creating quality contemporary dance training and performance projects with disadvantaged and marginalised individuals and communities from street children in Ethiopa to young offenders in Bradford and ‘reluctant’ young gangsters in East London. Burns’ (2006) observations regarding skills shortages within particular areas of the UK

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
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The place of migration
Mary Gilmartin and Allen White

, ‘migrant labour will be part of the solution to Europe’s future labour and skills shortages’ (2010: 24). The Reflection Group specifically highlighted the need for ‘skilled immigrants’, and this points out a second way in which migration matters in contemporary Europe. The borders of Europe are increasingly fortified against most migrants from outside the EU, with only those migrants classified as ‘skilled’ welcome in the EU. Some commentators describe this as ‘Fortress Europe’, or alternatively as a ‘gated community’ (Van Houtum and Pijpers, 2007), and suggest that the

in Migrations
A. James Hammerton

Australian plan. Andrew’s occupation, listed by the government as an area of skills shortage, together with Nicky’s nursing, facilitated a relatively easy bureaucratic process, which confirmed Andrew’s sense of the mobile quality of his training. ‘I considered the world my oyster, you know, I mean an electronic engineer, and I’m never going to be short of work, but … I can pick wherever I want in the world to live, so that’s effectively what we did.’ By 1992, back in Melbourne, Andrew’s rosy work prospects initially were dashed; job demand had been exaggerated and the

in Migrants of the British diaspora since the 1960S
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The Community Workers’ Co-operative
Joe Larragy

enterprise broadly divided into three ­categories – ­community enterprises, deficient demand enterprises and public service contract e­ nterprises – for the purposes of generating employment and meeting important local social needs. All of these enterprises belonged on a continuum between purely commercial and purely statutory provision. The timing, however, was not great because the labour market was changing so rapidly and instead of mass unemployment there were not just skill shortages, but labour shortages, in many sectors. The key initiative in the PPF talks proposed

in Asymmetric engagement
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The National Women’s Council of Ireland
Joe Larragy

. What seems to have been driving policy, more simply, was the unprecedented demand for labour at the time. Not only had the Irish economy run into skill shortages but there were labour The National Women’s Council of Ireland 199 shortages across the board. The budgetary measures on tax individualisation, side by side with the very limited policy on childcare provision in 2000, points to a strong labour market orientation on the part of the government with very limited reference to the wider aspects of childcare policy. The Programme for Prosperity and Fairness By

in Asymmetric engagement