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Gill Allwood and Khursheed Wadia

number of refugees with particular skills is an important step in understanding the contribution that they can make to the economy and society of their country of asylum. A number of research projects have stressed the economic contribution made by refugees and the wastage that can be avoided by recognising and harnessing the skills and experience that they bring with them, not least when these match skills shortages, as is often the case. National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) research in 2001 involving interviews with 70 respondents from 21

in Refugee women in Britain and France
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Gill Allwood and Khursheed Wadia

paradigm, longsettled migrants in Britain (of whom many acquire British nationality) are referred to as black and ethnic minority (BME) communities or populations in legislative and policy documents and in academic writing. If the term ‘immigrant’ is used at all, it is to refer to ‘new’ or ‘third wave’ migrants to Britain – i.e. labour migrants from the EU, labour migrants from third countries recruited to plug a skills shortage in a particular sector of the economy and to asylum seekers and refugees (see Chapter 2). Third, in France two terms are in frequent use

in Refugee women in Britain and France