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Art in the first industrial society
James Moore

generations who passed through their gates. Despite the increased scholarly interest in institutions as agents of social change, until recently art histories have been relatively silent on the general importance of institutional developments.91 Other disciplines have increasingly begun to see institutions as important in shaping patterns of human behaviour rather than simply being reflections of that behaviour. In economics the ‘institutionalist school’ has a long history dating back to the late nineteenth century, when figures such as Veblen, Commons and Mitchell all but

in High culture and tall chimneys
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Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

, Taiwan has developed a dynamic and internationally engaged art scene. Conclusion 5 Linda Jaivin, ‘Mali Wu: Profile Consuming Texts: The Work of Mali Wu’, n-Paradoxa, 5 (November 1997), pp. 54–7: 56. 6 Wei Hsiu Tung, Art for Social Change and Cultural Awakening: An Anthropology of Residence in Taiwan (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books, 2013), p. 107. 7 Larry Shao, ‘Interview with Wu Mali’, Asiart Archive Diaaalogue (November 2010), www.aaa.org.hk/Diaaalogue/Details/931, accessed 15 September 2014. 8 Wei Hsiu Tung, Art for Social Change, p. 149. 9 In Larry Shao

in Art and human rights
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

organised a number of international conferences, beginning with ‘Art and Human Rights’ (at the HRC, 2003); contributed to an edited volume with essays by a number of key scholars from the region on art and social change in Asia and the Pacific;20 and curated a number of exhibitions on the theme over the period 2003 to 2010.21 We found that many of the artists and arts commentators and museum professionals were concerned with the legacies of colonialism, immigration, multiculturalism and ‘the other within’ in their own cultures, and with the impact of globalisation and

in Art and human rights
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

modes of social organisation; and this is critical for any movement seeking social change. Jacques Rancière writes: Within any given framework, artists are those whose strategies aim to change the frames, speeds and scales according to which we perceive the visible, and combine it with a specific invisible element and a specific meaning. Such strategies are intended to make the invisible visible or to question the self-evidence of the visible.11 Art is at the heart of such strategies because of its capacity to offer alternative ways of seeing and knowing and

in Art and human rights
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Leah Modigliani

-Simon, the radical French thinker who fought for American independence with the French. For Saint-Simon, ‘avant-garde’ indicated a trinity of artists, engineers, and scientists working together to service progressive social change.28 By the late 1800s, however, artists and 7 8 Engendering an avant-garde writers influenced by Saint-Simon’s progressive views adopted different stances towards the relevance or usefulness of art in activating social change. As Egbert notes, Théophile Gautier would advocate for an art-for-arts sake divorced from political utility in the

in Engendering an avant-garde
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Foredoomed to failure?
Kent Fedorowich

settlement. The emphasis on agricultural settlement in the dominions and the eagerness to create a landed imperial yeomanry which would strengthen imperial defence, enhance primary production and act as a protected market for British manufactured goods, ignored the profound economic and social changes which were transforming the imperial relationship. The empire ‘as an organic system, harmoniously balanced

in Unfit for heroes
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

by industrial dumping.61 Harsono’s art would remain essentially activist, protesting to the degree practicable at the time against the oppressive features of the New Order of General Suharto. In 1983 he produced The Social Change, an installation of fifty panels on the beach near Yogyakarta, which bore enlarged photographs of peasants, trees and factories and commentaries on the destruction of tropical forests as a protest against environmental degradation – a major concern in the 1980s. Wardani points to Harsono’s work on the environment, noting his collaborations

in Art and human rights
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Tijana Vujošević

Architecture and Utopia (1973; Cambridge: MIT Press, 1976) and The Sphere and the Labyrinth (1980; Cambridge MIT Press, 1990), establishes that the work of Giovanni Battista Piranesi, which existed only on paper, marks the beginning of a utopian tradition which reflects the inherent contradictions of the capitalist order and the ultimate impossibility of producing social change within it. Capitalist designs share with those in the communist society the fundamental modern paradox: that effecting political change demands collaboration with the State and a betrayal of any

in Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man
Tijana Vujošević

of a society that may be fictional, existing only in an imagined outer space, but whose story is a lens for recognizing the potential of the present. It is a fiction that is intended to drive history. Bogdanov’s text about “red glasses” is about recognizing that communism is possible, but the notion of “red glasses” can also refer to the novel itself. Red Star was a vehicle for inciting communist passions and the desire to turn Earth from a green planet into a red one. The transcendental power that drives social change – what Tsiolkovksy would call “the will of the

in Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man
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Antigoni Memou

of Protest: Culture and Activism from Civil Rights Movement to the Streets of Seattle (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2005); G. Raunig, Art and Revolution: Transversal Activism in the Long Twentieth Century (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007); B. Stimson and G. Sholette (eds), Collectivism after Modernism: The Art of Social Imagination after 1945 (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2007); W. Bradley and C. Esche (eds), Art and Social Change: A Critical Reader (London: Tate, Afterall, 2007). 14 Activists Christophe Aguiton and Susan George

in Photography and social movements