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A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

, J-P. ( 2005 ), Anthropology and Development. Understanding Contemporary Social Change ( London : Zed Books ). Oosterhoff , P. and Wilkinson , A. ( 2015 ), ‘ Local Engagement in Ebola Outbreaks and Beyond in Sierra Leone ’, IDS Practice Paper in Brief , 24 , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Anca Mihaela Pusca

the revolution—seeking to understand the basis on which the democratic future of Romania was built and questioning the extent to which these original ideals or illusions match up with later assumptions about what people wanted and how they envisioned the democratic transformation. The study also offers an alternative explanation and classification of utopias or illusions by turning towards the fields of sociology and psychology, in order to better understand the way in which individuals and collectives use these illusions to navigate instances of social change. By

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

participation of diverse actors in local, national and international forums. Finally, we introduce a basic typology of six categories for understanding dance-based peacebuilding efforts: therapeutic; artist-led social change or protest; community-led social change or protest; collective forms; educational; and diplomatic. 1 Creating peace As Lederach suggests, 2 we believe that peace and positive social change require

in Dancing through the dissonance
Open Access (free)
Redefining security in the Middle East
Tami Amanda Jacoby and Brent E. Sasley

differences between Islam as a spiritual faith and Islamism as a politicized form of religion with tendencies to neo-absolutism and violence. This chapter explores fundamental issues related to Islamophobia and the West, the relationship between Islam and democracy, and circumstances for groups and parties to gain political power and effect social change through indigenous tools and symbols. The intricate

in Redefining security in the Middle East
The case of the Timisoara revolutionaries
Anca Mihaela Pusca

alternative view of the process of social change in Romania. There are a number of controversial ideas that surround the Romanian Revolution, the most important of which are: 1) that the Romanian Revolution was to a large extent unexpected; 2) that the main ideal of the revolution was a liberal democratic one; 3) that there were no negotiations with the Ceausescu regime; 4) that the National Salvation Front was the first political consolidation of power that came after the fall of the Ceausescu regime; 5) that there is “a truth” about what happened during the Romanian

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

hub dances enacts meaning around identity for self, others and the community, and how this relates to the creation of broader social change for peacebuilding. Where or what is the local, the global? What does that mean for a politics of peace? By making bodies central in our theorising, we are able to identify and generate new ways of thinking about global political dynamics, including in ways that can point to new directions for politics. 5 Our findings from the case studies

in Dancing through the dissonance
The case of Romania

The post-communist transition in Romania has been a period rife with high hopes and expectations as well as strong disappointments and disillusions. The engagement with these disappointments or disillusions has mainly fallen along the lines of critical editorial comments by dissidents and intellectuals or academic engagements that connect it to different forms of social and political apathy. What seems to be lacking however, is a more head-on engagement with disillusionment as a self-contained process that is not just a side-effect of political corruption or economic failures but rather an intrinsic part of any transition. This book provides the basis for a theory of disillusionment in instances of transition. It also elaborates on how such a theory could be applied to a specific case-study, in this instance, the Romanian transition from communism to capitalism. By defining disillusionment as the loss of particularly strong collective illusions, the book identifies what those illusions were in the context of the Romanian 1989 Revolution. It also seeks to understand the extent to which disillusionment is intrinsic to social change, and more importantly, determine whether it plays an essential role in shaping both the direction and the form of change. The book further inevitably places itself at the intersection of a number of different academic literatures: from regional and comparative studies, political science and "transitology" studies, to sociology, psychology and cultural studies.

Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

Abstract only
Anca Mihaela Pusca

disillusionment as the loss of particularly strong collective illusions, the book seeks to identify what those illusions were in the context of the Romanian 1989 Revolution, the period immediately following the revolution—marked mainly by the consolidation of the first political parties and civil society organizations, and the extent to which these initial illusions still play an important role in Romania today, more than seventeen years into the transition. By seeking to understand the extent to which disillusionment is intrinsic to social change, and more importantly, 2

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Abstract only
Anca Mihaela Pusca

chapter clearly suggested that a collective self-recognition of the trauma imposed by the transition as well as an acknowledgement of the “sacrifice” would do more good than forcing an overly positive image of it. Using Walter Benjamin’s creative engagements with the concept of shock, the chapter was also able to draw up some possible explanations for the relationship between intense feelings of nostalgia—in situations where these would not necessarily be warranted—and periods of transition and social change. Under particular circumstances, shock becomes much more than

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment