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Felix M. Bivens

19 MA in Participation, power and social change at University of Sussex Felix M. Bivens Context The MA in Participation (MAP) had its first intake of students in 2004. MAP is the product of several years of planning and more years of previous work by the Participation, Power and Social Change (PPSC) team at Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. The roots of PPSC connect to the highly influential work of Robert Chambers in the field of participatory development. In the 1990s, his books, including Whose Reality Counts? Putting the First

in Knowledge, democracy and action
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

, J-P. ( 2005 ), Anthropology and Development. Understanding Contemporary Social Change ( London : Zed Books ). Oosterhoff , P. and Wilkinson , A. ( 2015 ), ‘ Local Engagement in Ebola Outbreaks and Beyond in Sierra Leone ’, IDS Practice Paper in Brief , 24 , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Journalism in twentieth-century Ireland
Author: Mark O’Brien

This book examines the history of journalists and journalism in twentieth century Ireland. While many media institutions have been subjected to historical scrutiny, the professional and organisational development of journalists, the changing practices of journalism, and the contribution of journalists and journalism to the evolution of modern Ireland have not. This book rectifies this deficit by mapping the development of journalism in Ireland from the late 1880s to today. Beginning with the premise that the position of journalists and the power of journalism are products of their time and are shaped by ever-shifting political, economic, technological, and cultural forces it examines the background and values of those who worked as journalists, how they viewed and understood their role over the decades, how they organised and what they stood for as a professional body, how the prevailing political and social atmosphere facilitated or constrained their work, and, crucially, how their work impacted on social change and contributed to the development of modern Ireland. Placing the experiences of journalists and the practice of journalism at the heart of its analysis it examines, for the first time, the work of journalists within the ever-changing context of Irish society. Based on strong primary research – including the previously un-consulted journals and records produced by the many journalistic representative organisations that came and went over the decades – and written in an accessible and engaging style, this book will appeal to anyone interested in journalism, history, the media, and the development of Ireland as a modern nation.

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Politics and society in Northern Ireland over half a century

After three decades of violence, Northern Ireland has experienced unprecedented peace. It is now generally accepted that the peace accord which ended the Northern Ireland conflict, the 1998 Belfast Agreement, is an exemplar of this trend. This book examines the impact of the 1998 Agreement which halted the violence on the Northern Irish people. It covers changes in public opinion across all areas of society and politics, including elections, education, community relations and national identity. The surveys presented show that despite peace, Protestants and Catholics remain as deeply divided as ever. The book examines the development of the theory of consociationalism and how it has been woven into the intellectual debate about the nature of the Northern Ireland conflict. The role of religion in conflict transformation has emerged as an important issue in Northern Ireland. Ethnonationalism in Northern Ireland is fuelled by its multifaceted and complex nature. The constitutional position of Northern Ireland has been the topic of recurring debate since partition in 1920. The role of education in promoting social cohesion in post-conflict societies is often controversial. The book explores both the nature and extent of victimhood and the main perpetrators of the political violence. The key elements of a consociational approach include a grand coalition representing the main segments of society; proportionality in representation; community (segmental) autonomy; and mutual vetoes on key decisions. The main lesson of peace-making in Northern Ireland is that political reform has to be accompanied by social change across the society as a whole.

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Punk, politics and resistance

The Subcultures Network is a cross-disciplinary research network for scholars and students interested in the relationship between subcultures (in all their forms) and wider processes of social, cultural and political change. Bringing together theoretical analyses, empirical studies and methodological discussions, the network is designed to explore the relationships between subcultures and their historical context, and the place of subcultures within patterns of cultural and political change. This book is very much a product of the Network's brief and emerged, in large part, from the inaugural symposium held at London Metropolitan University in September 2011. The book is divided into three parts, each with a broadly defined theme. The first of these relates to punk and identity, particularly with regard to gender, class, age and race. The second part looks at punk's relationship to locality and space. In particular, it deals with two overlapping processes. First, the ways in which punk's transmission allowed for diverse interpretation and utilisation of the cultural form beyond local, regional and national boundaries. Second, the extent to which punk's aesthetic and expression was shaped by, inspired and reflected the environments in which its protagonists lived. The third and final part concentrates on communication and reception. From within the culture, the language of punk is brought under discursive analysis by Melani Schröter, who looks at the critiques of 'normality' contained within the lyrics of German punk bands from the late 1970s through to the present day.

Open Access (free)
Utopia
Graeme Kirkpatrick

development of the theory. As far as critical theory is concerned, Feenberg has continued and updated the tradition, retaining its focus on individual human self-realisation and the centrality of that idea to any meaningful conception of historical progress. Pursuant to this, his work takes as its problematic one of the most important questions of contemporary Marx scholarship, concerning the paradoxical relationship between technology and progressive social change. He is almost alone among Marx scholars of the past three or four decades in taking this question seriously

in Technical politics
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Michael Breen, Michael Courtney, Iain Mcmenamin, Eoin O’Malley and Kevin Rafter

, and social change. If they had limited impact Conclusion 143 in Ireland, we can expect them to have had even more limited or virtually no impact elsewhere. It may be that, due to the path dependency of media systems, such exogenous factors matter more across, rather than within, national media systems. Nonetheless, comparative research has not discovered strong consistent patterns (de Vreese et al., 2016). The liberalisation of the sector, combined with its small scale and economic crisis meant that, if there was an economic basis to hypercritical infotainment

in Resilient reporting
Michael Breen, Michael Courtney, Iain Mcmenamin, Eoin O’Malley and Kevin Rafter

painfully hip at pensionable age normally means exactly that’ (Molony, 2016). However, it is much less obvious how prevalent sexism is, what forms it takes, and to which extent it has changed over time. Attitudes to gender in Ireland have changed massively in the period covered by our study. We can test the effect of exogenous social change on the Irish media by looking at gender bias. Indeed, we can also check the extent to which the media was an agent of social change in this respect. As in the other chapters, we do not look at a small number of episodes in detail

in Resilient reporting
Felix M. Bivens

particular professor. Compared to other photography courses he taught, this one become far more interdisciplinary and focused on issues of ethics and power. Rather than adhering to a paradigm of personal creativity, the course focused on the potential role of art to document complex problems in society and to precipitate social change through challenging perceptions and by influencing policy debates. Human health in the environment This course in the university’s biology department acts as a sister course to the documentary photography class; it is also structured around

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Conversation between party and nation
Stephen Ingle

traced back to Restoration Toryism but the modern party took its shape in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries during a period of profound social change (see Mandler, 2007 ; Kumar, 2003 ). It is indicative of the confusion outlined in the introduction that when traditional English values were enlisted in the campaign to contain social change and parliamentary reform, the key thinker who deployed

in These Englands