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Frederick H. White

became further entwined within the imagination of his reading public. More specifically, the codification of illness in fin de siècle Russia was based on the social construction of disease and the individual’s internalization of these constructs. 31 Critics have tried to make connections between Andreev’s literary themes and those of Dostoevskii.32 Madness, criminality and alienation, however, are themes which cannot be ascribed to a single author or literary influence; these are a reflection of larger social anxieties. As a result, this study has asked scholars to

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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Frederick H. White

narrative theory is utilized by medical profession- 14 Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle als to gain an understanding of the realities of their patients’ lives with certain diseases and, in this same way, it provides a means of access for us into Andreev’s life with neurasthenia. The codification of illness Sander Gilman argues that there are at least two different levels in the codification of illness. One level is the social construction of the disease. The other is the internalization of these social constructions by those labeled as

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
Brunias’s ‘ladies’ of ambiguous race
Mia L. Bagneris

viewer. Without the telltale blush or stark contrast of black and white – only a confounding sea of diverse shades along the spectrum of brown – the women in Brunias’s paintings insistently refuse to make their whiteness – or its lack  – clearly legible. Physical embodiments of an epistemological conundrum, ambiguously raced bodies like these threaten to upend the whole scheme of race, first by exposing racial categories as social constructions rather than scientific facts, and then by revealing the unstable ground upon which these powerfully real fictions are

in Colouring the Caribbean
From letterpress to offset-lithography
Jesse Adams Stein

continuity and transformation of craft masculinity. This notion of material agency can of course be connected to the field of Actor Network Theory (ANT). In response to the dichotomous gulf between technological determinism (‘technologies cause change’) and social constructionism (‘technologies are shaped by and mirror society’), ANT theorists such as Bruno Latour called for a close consideration of the heterogeneous influence of ‘non-human’ actors (such as technologies, tools and systems) in complex social and technological entanglements.33 My use of the term ‘material

in Hot metal
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Dolores Tierney

foreign to a Mexico of social construction and progress. Sadly, in his twilight years of the late 1970s and early 1980s this great auteur was reduced to lingering around the Churubusco Studios in Mexico City, hoping to find financial backing for his film ideas. This book attempts to develop ways of reading Fernández’ films that will go beyond the myth of the ‘Golden Age’ and the clichés around Fernández that it

in Emilio Fernández
Leah Modigliani

emphasizing women’s needs and rights. At the beginning this awareness did not extend to the recognition that women were not unified in their life-experience, and that class, race, religion, ethnicity, and other factors intersected with ideological constraints in salient ways. Within visual arts, feminists took on the political goals of social transformation by adopting media and subject matter that called attention to the social construction of gender more explicitly than the traditional academic art forms of painting and sculpture allowed. In particular, feminist

in Engendering an avant-garde
Word and image in the twenty-first century. Envoi
Catherine Gander and Sarah Garland

; and pluralist materialism. Perhaps most importantly for this volume, they also connect with the move away from the ‘linguistic turn’ of the latter half of the twentieth century to incorporate neuro-, cognitive and quantum sciences while at the same time often ‘returning to and reactivating work that had been taking place well before and alongside the linguistic turn and its attendant social constructions’, such as the socio-aesthetic and empirical findings of Susanne Langer, John Dewey, Raymond Williams and Frantz Fanon.62 The body in all such approaches is

in Mixed messages
The afterlife of Brunias’s imagery
Mia L. Bagneris

of interpretations that seem contrary to the purposes for which they were created. While some of these readings would probably not 233 234 Colouring the Caribbean 68a–d Unknown artist (after Agostino Brunias), untitled watercolours from the collection of Aaron and Marjorie Matalon, n.d. have been explicitly available to viewers at the time, who, for example, were almost certainly not thinking about race as a social construction in the way that twenty-first-century viewers might, the instability of Brunias’s imagery, while not necessarily – or even probably

in Colouring the Caribbean
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Towards creolizing transnational South Asian art histories
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

artworks by artists of Asian descent living in the United States.74 To productively open up both of these art histories beyond social constructions of identity and genealogy, I focus on connecting formal similarities of abstract work produced in the 1960s in New York City by Cy Twombly and Natvar Bhavsar. Given the dominant interpretive models for post-Second World War art movements that emphasize form at the expense of inclusion of work by artists of Asian descent, this chapter also serves to reimagine this period in art history. 11 12 Productive failure Chapter 4

in Productive failure
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Labour, design and culture
Jesse Adams Stein

. 13–32; S. Maynard, ‘Rough work and rugged men: the social construction of masculinity in working class history’, Labour/Le Travail 23 (1989), 159–69; P. Willis, ‘Shop floor culture, masculinity, and the wage form’, in J. Clarke, C. Critcher and R. Johnson (eds), Workingclass Culture: Studies in History and Theory (Birmingham and London: Hutchinson, 1979), pp. 185–98; P. Thompson, ‘Playing at being skilled men: factory culture and pride in work skills among Coventry car workers’, Social History 13:1 (1988), 45–69; High and Lewis, Corporate Wasteland. 27 See for

in Hot metal